Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/edn3.162
Title: Seeking life in sedimented waters: Environmental DNA from diverse habitat types reveals ecologically significant species in a tropical marine environment
Authors: IP YIN CHEONG 
TAY YWEE CHIEH 
CHANG JIA JIN, MARC 
Ang, Hui Ping
Tun, Karenne Phyu Phyu
CHOU LOKE MING 
Huang Danwei 
MEIER,RUDOLF 
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2020
Publisher: Wiley
Citation: IP YIN CHEONG, TAY YWEE CHIEH, CHANG JIA JIN, MARC, Ang, Hui Ping, Tun, Karenne Phyu Phyu, CHOU LOKE MING, Huang Danwei, MEIER,RUDOLF (2020-11-21). Seeking life in sedimented waters: Environmental DNA from diverse habitat types reveals ecologically significant species in a tropical marine environment. Environmental DNA. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/edn3.162
Abstract: Environmental DNA (eDNA) with metabarcoding or metagenomics will likely become a major biomonitoring tool in the 21st century, perhaps even more so in the face of increased coastal urbanization and its associated effects such as pollution, land reclamation, and seabed dredging. Together, these impacts and the consequent high turbidity pose severe challenges to traditional survey techniques that rely heavily on visual observations. We here demonstrate that eDNA can be used for biomonitoring in turbid waters, using Singapore as a case study. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) locus was used to detect 525 metazoan molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) based on eDNA obtained from 52 L of filtered seawater. Of these, 130 MOTUs (24.7%) were identifiable to species, including ecologically significant species that in some cases were invasive or rarely observed. Metazoan signals also enabled discrimination of discrete, but connected, environments from intertidal and subtidal zones. Taxa with known habitat preferences were found to have left trace eDNA at sites that matched putatively suitable habitats. Moreover, no coast‐specific signals were detected in open water samples, which suggest that intermixing of water was limited. The study confirms that eDNA metabarcoding is a viable biomonitoring tool for coastal areas with highly sedimented waters.
Source Title: Environmental DNA
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/187902
ISSN: 2637-4943
DOI: 10.1002/edn3.162
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