Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00489
Title: Studies on B Cells in the Fruit-Eating Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto)
Authors: Periasamy, Pravin 
Hutchinson, Paul E 
Chen, Jinmiao 
Bonne, Isabelle 
Hameed, Shahana Shereene Shahul
Selvam, Pavithra
Hey, Ying Ying 
Fink, Katja
Irving, Aaron T 
Dutertre, Charles-Antoine 
Bakers, Michelle
Crameri, Gary
Wang, Lin-Fa 
Alonso, Sylvie 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Immunology
bat
adaptive immunity
Pteropus alecto
Eonycteris spelaea
cross-reactive antibodies
TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS
CROSS-REACTIVITY
BATS
ACTIVATION
CHALLENGES
EVOLUTION
ECOLOGY
FLIGHT
HOST
Issue Date: 14-Mar-2019
Publisher: FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Citation: Periasamy, Pravin, Hutchinson, Paul E, Chen, Jinmiao, Bonne, Isabelle, Hameed, Shahana Shereene Shahul, Selvam, Pavithra, Hey, Ying Ying, Fink, Katja, Irving, Aaron T, Dutertre, Charles-Antoine, Bakers, Michelle, Crameri, Gary, Wang, Lin-Fa, Alonso, Sylvie (2019-03-14). Studies on B Cells in the Fruit-Eating Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto). FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY 10. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.00489
Abstract: The ability of bats to act as reservoir for viruses that are highly pathogenic to humans suggests unique properties and functional characteristics of their immune system. However, the lack of bat specific reagents, in particular antibodies, has limited our knowledge of bat's immunity. Here, we report a panel of cross-reactive antibodies against MHC-II, NK1.1, CD3, CD21, CD27, and immunoglobulin (Ig), that allows flow cytometry analysis of B, T and NK cell populations in two different fruit-eating bat species namely, Pteropus alecto and E. spelaea. Results confirmed predominance of T cells in the spleen and blood of bats, as previously reported by us. However, the percentages of B cells in bone marrow and NK cells in spleen varied greatly between wild caught P. alecto bats and E. spelaea colony bats, which may reflect inherent differences of their immune system or different immune status. Other features of bat B cells were investigated. A significant increase in sIg+ B cell population was observed in the spleen and blood from LPS-injected bats but not from poly I:C-injected bats, supporting T-independent polyclonal B cell activation by LPS. Furthermore, using an in vitro calcium release assay, P. alecto B cells exhibited significant calcium release upon cross-linking of their B cell receptor. Together, this work contributes to improve our knowledge of bat adaptive immunity in particular B cells.
Source Title: FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155079
ISSN: 1664-3224
1664-3224
DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.00489
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