Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2022.03.015
Title: Differences between multimodal brain-age and chronological-age are linked to telomere shortening
Authors: Yu, Junhong 
Kanchi, Madhu Mathi 
Rawtaer, Iris 
Feng, Lei 
Kumar, Alan Prem 
Kua, Ee-Heok 
Mahendran, Rathii 
Keywords: Brain-age
Cognitive-age
Telomere
Resting-state functional connectivity
Structural connectivity
Subcortical gray matter
Cortical thickness
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2022
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
Citation: Yu, Junhong, Kanchi, Madhu Mathi, Rawtaer, Iris, Feng, Lei, Kumar, Alan Prem, Kua, Ee-Heok, Mahendran, Rathii (2022-07-01). Differences between multimodal brain-age and chronological-age are linked to telomere shortening. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING 115 : 60-69. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2022.03.015
Abstract: Telomere shortening is theorized to accelerate biological aging, however, this has not been tested in the brain and cognitive contexts. We used machine learning age-prediction models to determine brain/cognitive age and quantified the degree of accelerated aging as the discrepancy between brain and/or cognitive and chronological ages (i.e., age gap). We hypothesized these age gaps are associated with telomere length (TL). Using healthy participants from the ADNI-3 cohort (N = 196, Agemean=70.7), we trained age-prediction models using 4 modalities of brain features and cognitive scores, as well as a ‘stacked’ model combining all brain modalities. Then, these 6 age-prediction models were applied to an independent sample diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (N = 91, Agemean=71.3) to determine, for each subject, the model-specific predicted age and age gap. TL was most strongly associated with age gaps from the resting-state functional connectivity model after controlling for confounding variables. Overall, telomere shortening was significantly related to older brain but not cognitive age gaps. In particular, functional relative to structural brain-age gaps, were more strongly implicated in telomere shortening.
Source Title: NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234177
ISSN: 0197-4580
1558-1497
DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2022.03.015
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