Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001654
Title: Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis as a Target for Improved Post-Surgical Outcomes and Improved Patient Care: A Review of Current Literature
Authors: Mustansir Dawoodbhoy, Fatema
Patel, Bharati Kadamb 
Patel, Kadamb 
Bhatia, Madhav 
Lee, Chuen Neng 
Moochhala, Shabbir M 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Critical Care Medicine
Hematology
Surgery
Peripheral Vascular Disease
General & Internal Medicine
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
Acute respiratory distress syndrome
bacterial translocation
fecal microbiota transplant
gut dysbiosis
gut microbiota
prebiotics
probiotics
sepsis
VENTILATOR-ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA
LUNG MICROBIOME
BACTERIAL TRANSLOCATION
POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS
SEPTIC COMPLICATIONS
SEPSIS
TRANSPLANTATION
MECHANISMS
DISEASE
FLORA
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2021
Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS
Citation: Mustansir Dawoodbhoy, Fatema, Patel, Bharati Kadamb, Patel, Kadamb, Bhatia, Madhav, Lee, Chuen Neng, Moochhala, Shabbir M (2021-04-01). Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis as a Target for Improved Post-Surgical Outcomes and Improved Patient Care: A Review of Current Literature. SHOCK 55 (4) : 441-454. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001654
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Critical illness results in significant changes in the human gut microbiota, leading to the breakdown of the intestinal barrier function, which plays a role in the pathogenesis of multiple organ dysfunction. Patients with sepsis/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have a profoundly distorted intestinal microbiota rhythm, which plays a considerable role in the development of gut-derived infections and intestinal dysbiosis. Despite recent medical developments, postsurgical complications are associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Bacterial translocation, which is the movement of bacteria and bacterial products across the intestinal barrier, was shown to be a mechanism behind sepsis. Current research is focusing on a solution by addressing significant factors that contribute to intestinal dysbiosis, which subsequently leads to multiple organ failure and, thus, mortality. It may, however, be challenging to manipulate the microbiota in critically ill patients for enhanced therapeutic gain. Probiotic manipulation is advantageous for maintaining the gut-barrier defense and for modulating the immune response. Based on available published research, this review aims to address the application of potential strategies in the intensive care unit, supplemented with current therapeutics by the administration of probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplant, to reduce post-surgical complications of sepsis/ARDS in critically ill patients.
Source Title: SHOCK
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/227076
ISSN: 1073-2322
1540-0514
DOI: 10.1097/SHK.0000000000001654
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