Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1910-3
Title: Current knowledge, attitude and behaviour of hand and food hygiene in a developed residential community of Singapore: A cross-sectional survey Trauma care and orthopedic surgery
Authors: Pang, J 
Chua, S.W.J.L 
Hsu, L 
Keywords: adult
attitude to health
cross-sectional study
diarrhea
female
food
hand
hand washing
human
hygiene
incidence
male
middle aged
multivariate analysis
odds ratio
questionnaire
risk factor
sanitation
Singapore
socioeconomics
statistical model
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea
Female
Food
Hand
Hand Disinfection
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hygiene
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Risk Factors
Sanitation
Singapore
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Pang, J, Chua, S.W.J.L, Hsu, L (2015). Current knowledge, attitude and behaviour of hand and food hygiene in a developed residential community of Singapore: A cross-sectional survey Trauma care and orthopedic surgery. BMC Public Health 15 (1) : 577. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1910-3
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Background: Diarrhoea incidence has been increasing progressively over the past years in developed countries, including Singapore, despite the accessibility and availability to clean water, well-established sanitation infrastructures and regular hygiene promotion. The aim of this study is to determine the current knowledge, attitude and behaviour of hand and food hygiene, and the potential risk factors of diarrhoea in a residential community of Singapore. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted within a residential area in the west of Singapore from June to August 2013. A total of 1,156 household units were randomly sampled and invited to participate in an interviewer-assisted survey using standardised questionnaires. Descriptive, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, Fisher's Exact test and multivariate logistic regression modelling, respectively. R program was used for all statistical analysis. All tests were conducted at 5 % level of significance with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) reported where applicable. Results: A total of 240 units (20.8 %) consented and responded to the survey invitation. About 77 % of the expected knowledge and attitude were observed in at least 80 % of the participants, compared to only about 31 % of the expected behaviours and practises. Being single [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)∈=∈2.29; 95 % CI∈=∈1.16-4.48], having flu in the past six month (AOR∈=∈3.24; 95 % CI∈=∈1.74-6.06), preferred self-medication (AOR∈=∈2.07; 95 % CI∈=∈1.06-4.12) were risk factors of diarrhoea. Washing hands with water before attending to children or sick persons (AOR∈=∈0.30; 95 % CI∈=∈0.11-0.82), washing hands with water (AOR∈=∈0.16; 95 % CI∈=∈0.05-0.45) and water with soap (AOR∈=∈0.29; 95 % CI∈=∈0.12-0.72) after attending to children or sick persons, and hand washing between 30 s to a minute (AOR∈=∈0.44; 95 % CI∈=∈0.20-0.90) were protective factors against diarrhoea. Conclusions: Good knowledge and attitude of the participants did not positively translate into high compliance and motivation to perform good hygiene practices. This observation may have resulted in a significant extent on the increasing diarrhoea incidences. Current interventions may be improved with more active community partnership among the residents, schools and the relevant social organizations, to raise awareness on the importance of compliance to good hygiene practices, and the risk factors of diarrhoea. A large case-control study would be required to validate these findings in future. © 2015 Pang et al.
Source Title: BMC Public Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181446
ISSN: 14712458
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-015-1910-3
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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