Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.27.9.2166
Title: Effect of high-dose vitamin E on insulin resistance and associated parameters in overweight subjects
Authors: Manning, P.J 
Sutherland, W.H.F
Walker, R.J
Williams, S.M
De Jong, S.A
Ryalls, A.R
Berry, E.A
Keywords: alanine aminotransferase
alpha tocopherol
fatty acid
glucose
insulin
peroxide
triacylglycerol
adult
article
clinical trial
concentration response
controlled clinical trial
controlled study
correlation analysis
diabetes mellitus
dose time effect relation
enzyme blood level
female
glucose blood level
homeostasis
human
insulin blood level
insulin resistance
insulin response
liver cell
major clinical study
male
obesity
oxidative stress
randomized controlled trial
statistical significance
vitamin intake
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants
Blood Glucose
Body Mass Index
C-Reactive Protein
Enzymes
Female
Humans
Insulin
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Placebos
Reference Values
Vitamin E
Issue Date: 2004
Citation: Manning, P.J, Sutherland, W.H.F, Walker, R.J, Williams, S.M, De Jong, S.A, Ryalls, A.R, Berry, E.A (2004). Effect of high-dose vitamin E on insulin resistance and associated parameters in overweight subjects. Diabetes Care 27 (9) : 2166-2171. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.27.9.2166
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: OBJECTIVE - Markers of oxidative stress and plasma alanine transferase (ALT) levels are increased and circulating antioxidant concentrations are reduced in individuals with insulin resistance. Vitamin E improves glycemic control in people with diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin E would decrease markers of oxidative stress and plasma ALT levels and improve insulin sensitivity in overweight individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Eighty overweight individuals (BMI >27 kg/m2) were randomly allocated to receive either 800 IU vitamin E per day or a matching placebo for 3 months. The dose of vitamin E was increased to 1,200 IU per day for a further 3 months. RESULTS - Plasma peroxides decreased by 27% at 3 months and by 29% at 6 months in the group that received vitamin E and were positively correlated with plasma vitamin E concentrations at the 6-month time point. At 3 months, fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were significantly reduced and homeostasis model assessment increased. These changes were not apparent at 6 months. Plasma ALT concentrations declined significantly throughout the study period. CONCLUSIONS - In conclusion, these findings indicate that vitamin E improves oxidative stress and hepatocellular function. Although insulin resistance also improves, this effect appears transient.
Source Title: Diabetes Care
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181105
ISSN: 01495992
DOI: 10.2337/diacare.27.9.2166
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_2337_diacare_27_9_2166.pdf103.61 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

105
checked on May 21, 2022

Page view(s)

124
checked on May 12, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons