Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.13248
Title: Resting heart rate variability and exercise capacity in Type 1 diabetes
Authors: Wilson, L.C
Peebles, K.C
Hoye, N.A
Manning, P 
Sheat, C
Williams, M.J.A
Wilkins, G.T
Wilson, G.A
Baldi, J.C
Keywords: hemoglobin A1c
catecholamine
adolescent
adrenalin blood level
adult
Article
autonomic dysfunction
bicycle ergometry
blood glucose monitoring
blood pressure
body mass
breathing rate
catecholamine blood level
child
clinical article
controlled study
disease duration
electrocardiography
electrochemical detection
exercise
female
heart rate
heart rate variability
high performance liquid chromatography
human
insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
insulin treatment
male
noradrenalin blood level
physical activity
questionnaire
resting heart rate
blood
breathing
case control study
heart rate
non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
oxygen consumption
pathophysiology
Adult
Blood Pressure
Case-Control Studies
Catecholamines
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Exercise
Female
Heart Rate
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption
Respiration
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Wilson, L.C, Peebles, K.C, Hoye, N.A, Manning, P, Sheat, C, Williams, M.J.A, Wilkins, G.T, Wilson, G.A, Baldi, J.C (2017). Resting heart rate variability and exercise capacity in Type 1 diabetes. Physiological Reports 5 (8) : e13248. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.13248
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have lower exercise capacity (V?O2max) than their age-matched nondiabetic counterparts (CON), which might be related to cardiac autonomic dysfunction. We examined whether Heart Rate Variability (HRV; indicator of cardiac autonomic modulation) was associated with exercise capacity in those with and without T1D. Twenty-three participants with uncomplicated T1D and 17 matched CON were recruited. Heart rate (HR; ECG), blood pressure (BP; finger photo-plethysmography), and respiratory rate (respiratory belt) were measured during baseline, paced-breathing and clinical autonomic reflex tests (CARTs); deep breathing, lying-to-stand, and Valsalva maneuver. Baseline and paced-breathing ECG were analyzed for HRV (frequency-domain). Exercise capacity was determined during an incremental cycle ergometer test while V?O2, 12-lead ECG, and BP were measured. In uncomplicated T1D, resting HR was elevated and resting HRV metrics were reduced, indicative of altered cardiac parasympathetic modulation; this was generally undetected by the CARTs. However, BP and plasma catecholamines were not different between groups. In T1D, V?O2max tended to be lower (P = 0.07) and HR reserve was lower (P < 0.01). Resting Total Power (TP) had stronger positive associations with V?O2max (R2 ? 0.3) than all other traditional indicators such as age, resting HR, and self-reported exercise (R2= 0.042–0.3) in both T1D and CON. Alterations in cardiac autonomic modulation are an early manifestation of uncomplicated T1D. Total Power was associated with reduced exercise capacity regardless of group, and these associations were generally stronger than traditional indicators. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.
Source Title: Physiological Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178683
ISSN: 2051817X
DOI: 10.14814/phy2.13248
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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