Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180818
Title: Age-dependent relationships between body mass index and mortality: Singapore longitudinal ageing study
Authors: Ng T.P. 
Jin A.
Chow K.Y.
Feng L. 
Nyunt M.S.Z. 
Yap K.B. 
Keywords: adult
age
age distribution
aged
all cause mortality
Article
body mass
body weight
cardiovascular disease
cardiovascular mortality
cerebrovascular accident
Chinese
cohort analysis
controlled study
female
human
longitudinal study
major clinical study
male
mortality
obesity
prospective study
Singapore
underweight
body mass
cause of death
complication
follow up
middle aged
mortality
physiology
proportional hazards model
risk factor
trends
very elderly
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cause of Death
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Obesity
Overweight
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Singapore
Thinness
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Ng T.P., Jin A., Chow K.Y., Feng L., Nyunt M.S.Z., Yap K.B. (2017). Age-dependent relationships between body mass index and mortality: Singapore longitudinal ageing study. PLoS ONE 12 (7) : e0180818. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180818
Abstract: Objectives: The relationship between body mass index (BMI) with mortality risk, in particular the BMI category associated with the lowest all-cause and CVD-and-stroke mortality and the BMI threshold for defining overweight or obesity in older persons is controversial. This study investigated the age-dependent associations of BMI categories with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke mortality. Method: Prospective cohort study (Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies) of older adults aged 55 and above, followed up from 2003 to 2011. Participants were 2605 Chinese with baseline BMI and other variables. Outcome Measurement: Mortality hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause and CVD and stroke mortality. Results: Overall, BMI showed a U-shaped relationship with all-cause and CVD and stroke mortality, being lowest at Normal Weight-II category (BMI 23.0–24.9 kg/m2). Most evidently among the middle-aged (55–64 years), all-cause mortality risks relative to Normal Weight-II were elevated for underweight (30.0; HR = 4.05,p = 0.0423). Among the old (65 years), however, Overweight and Obese categories were not significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality (HR from 0.98 to 1.29), but Overweight-Obese was associated with increased CVD and stroke mortality (HR = 10.0, p = 0.0086). Conclusion: BMI showed a U-shaped relationship with mortality. Among older persons aged 65 and above, the overweight-or-obese category of BMI was not associated with excess all-cause mortality. © 2017 Ng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165783
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180818
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