Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/edt.12415
Title: Understanding patients' and dentists' perspectives in dental trauma management: A mixed-methods study
Authors: Ode, Wataru 
Lopez, Violeta 
Wong, Mun Loke 
Schou, Lone 
Yu, Victoria Soo Hoon 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine
dental traumatology
focus group discussion
mixed-methods approach
Oral Health Impact Profile
quality of life
traumatic dental injuries
ORAL-HEALTH
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION
INJURIES
EPIDEMIOLOGY
GUIDELINES
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
Publisher: WILEY
Citation: Ode, Wataru, Lopez, Violeta, Wong, Mun Loke, Schou, Lone, Yu, Victoria Soo Hoon (2018-10-01). Understanding patients' and dentists' perspectives in dental trauma management: A mixed-methods study. DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY 34 (5) : 320-328. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/edt.12415
Abstract: © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background/Aim: Patients suffering dental trauma are unprepared for the disability challenge and necessary rehabilitation, while a traumatic event places an expanded demand on the dentist who is focused on treating disease. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) on patients and to compare patients’ and dentists’ perceptions of the event. Material and methods: TDI patients (aged ≥ 21 years) attending a tertiary dental hospital from 2011 to 2013, and their dentists were recruited with informed consent. An exploratory sequential mixed-methods design was adopted. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) quantitatively identified patients with “very often,” “fairly often” or “occasionally” in at least one of the OHIP-14 questions (Phase 1) to participate in the qualitative phase of the study through focus group discussions (FGD) (Phase 2). FGD for dentists was conducted separately. Results: Quantitative analysis showed 28%-55% of TDI patients had “occasional” to “very often” discomfort during eating, increased self-consciousness and embarrassment. Qualitative analysis showed patients were concerned with aesthetic disability, treatment cost and potential tooth loss but overcame their negative outlook and accepted prescribed protective measures. Dentists appreciated patients’ concerns about aesthetics and functional disruptions but were less attuned to patients’ sense of guilt and fear of judgement. Conclusions: TDI exert functional, psychological and social impacts on patients. Patients’ and dentists’ perspectives were useful for understanding the need for continuity of care, and the findings could contribute to effective TDI management.
Source Title: DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155052
ISSN: 1600-4469
1600-9657
DOI: 10.1111/edt.12415
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