Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
Title: Do birds of a feather flock together within a team-based physical activity intervention? A social network analysis
Authors: Edney, S 
Olds, T
Ryan, J
Plotnikoff, R
Vandelanotte, C
Curtis, R
Maher, C
Keywords: health behavior
homophily
social contagion
Adult
Australia
Body Mass Index
Exercise
Female
Friends
Health Promotion
Humans
Internet
Male
Sedentary Behavior
Self Report
Social Behavior
Social Networking
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2019
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Citation: Edney, S, Olds, T, Ryan, J, Plotnikoff, R, Vandelanotte, C, Curtis, R, Maher, C (2019-01-01). Do birds of a feather flock together within a team-based physical activity intervention? A social network analysis. Journal of Physical Activity and Health 16 (9) : 745-751. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
Abstract: Background: Homophily is the tendency to associate with friends similar to ourselves. This study explored the effects of homophily on team formation in a physical activity challenge in which “captains” signed up their Facebook friends to form teams. Methods: This study assessed whether participants (n = 430) were more similar to their teammates than to nonteammates with regard to age, sex, education level, body mass index, self-reported and objectively measured physical activity, and negative emotional states; and whether captains were more similar to their own teammates than to nonteammates. Variability indices were calculated for each team, and a hypothetical variability index, representing that which would result from randomly assembled teams, was also calculated. Results: Within-team variability was less than that for random teams for all outcomes except education level and depression, with differences (SDs) ranging from +0.15 (self-reported physical activity) to +0.47 (age) (P < .001 to P = .001). Captains were similar to their teammates except in regard to age, with captains being 2.6 years younger (P = .003). Conclusions: Results support hypotheses that self-selected teams are likely to contain individuals with similar characteristics, highlighting potential to leverage team-based health interventions to target specific populations by instructing individuals with risk characteristics to form teams to help change behavior.
Source Title: Journal of Physical Activity and Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226748
ISSN: 15433080
15435474
DOI: 10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
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