Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
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dc.titleDo birds of a feather flock together within a team-based physical activity intervention? A social network analysis
dc.contributor.authorEdney, S
dc.contributor.authorOlds, T
dc.contributor.authorRyan, J
dc.contributor.authorPlotnikoff, R
dc.contributor.authorVandelanotte, C
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, R
dc.contributor.authorMaher, C
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-08T07:53:54Z
dc.date.available2022-06-08T07:53:54Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.identifier.citationEdney, S, Olds, T, Ryan, J, Plotnikoff, R, Vandelanotte, C, Curtis, R, Maher, C (2019-01-01). Do birds of a feather flock together within a team-based physical activity intervention? A social network analysis. Journal of Physical Activity and Health 16 (9) : 745-751. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
dc.identifier.issn15433080
dc.identifier.issn15435474
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226748
dc.description.abstractBackground: Homophily is the tendency to associate with friends similar to ourselves. This study explored the effects of homophily on team formation in a physical activity challenge in which “captains” signed up their Facebook friends to form teams. Methods: This study assessed whether participants (n = 430) were more similar to their teammates than to nonteammates with regard to age, sex, education level, body mass index, self-reported and objectively measured physical activity, and negative emotional states; and whether captains were more similar to their own teammates than to nonteammates. Variability indices were calculated for each team, and a hypothetical variability index, representing that which would result from randomly assembled teams, was also calculated. Results: Within-team variability was less than that for random teams for all outcomes except education level and depression, with differences (SDs) ranging from +0.15 (self-reported physical activity) to +0.47 (age) (P < .001 to P = .001). Captains were similar to their teammates except in regard to age, with captains being 2.6 years younger (P = .003). Conclusions: Results support hypotheses that self-selected teams are likely to contain individuals with similar characteristics, highlighting potential to leverage team-based health interventions to target specific populations by instructing individuals with risk characteristics to form teams to help change behavior.
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjecthealth behavior
dc.subjecthomophily
dc.subjectsocial contagion
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectBody Mass Index
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFriends
dc.subjectHealth Promotion
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInternet
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectSedentary Behavior
dc.subjectSelf Report
dc.subjectSocial Behavior
dc.subjectSocial Networking
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-06-07T05:25:32Z
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.description.doi10.1123/jpah.2018-0585
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Physical Activity and Health
dc.description.volume16
dc.description.issue9
dc.description.page745-751
dc.published.statePublished
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