Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11060311
Title: A derivative of butyric acid, the fermentation metabolite of staphylococcus epidermidis, inhibits the growth of a staphylococcus aureus strain isolated from atopic dermatitis patients
Authors: Traisaeng, S.
Herr, D.R. 
Kao, H.-J.
Chuang, T.-H.
Huang, C.-M.
Keywords: Atopic dermatitis
Butyric acid derivative
Fermentation
Microbiome
S. aureus
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: MDPI AG
Citation: Traisaeng, S., Herr, D.R., Kao, H.-J., Chuang, T.-H., Huang, C.-M. (2019). A derivative of butyric acid, the fermentation metabolite of staphylococcus epidermidis, inhibits the growth of a staphylococcus aureus strain isolated from atopic dermatitis patients. Toxins 11 (6) : 311. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins11060311
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: The microbiome is a rich source of metabolites for the development of novel drugs. Butyric acid, for example, is a short-chain fatty acid fermentation metabolite of the skin probiotic bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). Glycerol fermentation of S. epidermidis resulted in the production of butyric acid and effectively hindered the growth of a Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strain isolated from skin lesions of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) in vitro and in vivo. This approach, however, is unlikely to be therapeutically useful since butyric acid is malodorous and requires a high concentration in the mM range for growth suppression of AD S. aureus. A derivative of butyric acid, BA–NH–NH–BA, was synthesized by conjugation of two butyric acids to both ends of an –NH–O–NH– linker. BA–NH–NH–BA significantly lowered the concentration of butyric acid required to inhibit the growth of AD S. aureus. Like butyric acid, BA–NH–NH–BA functioned as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor by inducing the acetylation of Histone H3 lysine 9 (AcH3K9) in human keratinocytes. Furthermore, BA–NH–NH–BA ameliorated AD S. aureus-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 and remarkably reduced the colonization of AD S. aureus in mouse skin. These results describe a novel derivative of a skin microbiome fermentation metabolite that exhibits anti-inflammatory and S. aureus bactericidal activity. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: Toxins
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/212302
ISSN: 20726651
DOI: 10.3390/toxins11060311
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_3390_toxins11060311.pdf2.73 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

18
checked on Sep 30, 2022

Page view(s)

63
checked on Sep 29, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons