Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2021.105312
Title: Among-genotype responses of the coral Pocillopora acuta to emersion: implications for the ecological engineering of artificial coastal defences
Authors: Hui En Pang
DU ROSA CELIA POQUITA 
JAIN SUDHANSHI SANJEEV 
Huang Danwei 
PETER ALAN TODD 
Keywords: Air exposure
ecological engineering
photophysiology
Phenotypic plasticity
Transplantation
Issue Date: 26-Mar-2021
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Hui En Pang, DU ROSA CELIA POQUITA, JAIN SUDHANSHI SANJEEV, Huang Danwei, PETER ALAN TODD (2021-03-26). Among-genotype responses of the coral Pocillopora acuta to emersion: implications for the ecological engineering of artificial coastal defences 168 (105312). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2021.105312
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Abstract: Stony corals are promising transplant candidates for the ecological engineering of artificial coastal defences such as seawalls as they attract and host numerous other organisms. However, seawalls are exposed to a wide range of environmental stressors associated with periods of emersion during low tide such as desiccation and changes in salinity, temperature, and solar irradiance. All of these variables have known deleterious effects on coral physiology, growth, and fitness. In this study, we performed parallel experiments (in situ and ex situ) to examine among-genotype responses of Pocillopora acuta to emersion by quantifying growth, photophysiological metrics (Fv/Fm, non-photochemical quenching [NPQ], endosymbiont density, and chlorophyll [chl] a concentration) and survival, following different emersion periods. Results showed that coral fragments emersed for longer durations (> 2 h) exhibited reduced growth and survival. Endosymbiont density and NPQ, but not Fv/Fm and chl a concentration, varied significantly among genotypes across different durations of emersion. Overall, the ability of P. acuta to tolerate emersion for up to two hours indicates it has potential to serve as a ‘starter species’ for transplantation efforts on seawalls. Further, careful characterisation and selection of genotypes with a high capacity to withstand emersion can help maximise the efficacy of ecological engineering using coral transplants.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/190300
ISSN: 01411136
DOI: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2021.105312
Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Pang et al_accepted MS.pdfAccepted manuscript939.72 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

Post-print Available on 26-03-2023
Fig. S1A and S1B.jpgSupplementary Figures S1A and S1B86.45 kBJPEG

OPEN

Post-print Available on 26-03-2023
Fig. S2A and S2B.jpgSupplementary Figures S2A and S2B95.82 kBJPEG

OPEN

Post-print Available on 26-03-2023

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons