Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph8083192
Title: Prevalence of symptoms of severe asthma and allergies in irish school children: An ISAAC protocol study, 1995-2007
Authors: Kabir, Z
Manning, P.J 
Holohan, J
Goodman, P.G
Clancy, L
Keywords: adolescent
air quality
article
asthma
child
clinical protocol
cross-sectional study
disease severity
eczema
environmental factor
female
hay fever
health survey
human
major clinical study
male
Poisson distribution
prevalence
primary school
questionnaire
Adolescent
Asthma
Eczema
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland
Linear Models
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal
Time Factors
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: Kabir, Z, Manning, P.J, Holohan, J, Goodman, P.G, Clancy, L (2011). Prevalence of symptoms of severe asthma and allergies in irish school children: An ISAAC protocol study, 1995-2007. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 8 (8) : 3192-3201. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph8083192
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Childhood asthma is a recurring health burden and symptoms of severe asthma in children are also emerging as a health and economic issue. This study examined changing patterns in symptoms of severe asthma and allergies (ever eczema and hay fever), using the Irish International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) protocol. ISAAC is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire survey of randomly selected representative post-primary schools. Children aged 13-14 years were studied: 2,670 (in 1995), 2,273 (in 1998), 2,892 (in 2002-2003), and 2,805 (in 2007). Generalized linear modelling using Poisson distribution was employed to compute adjusted prevalence ratios (PR). A 39% significant increase in symptoms of severe asthma was estimated in 2007 relative to the baseline year 1995 (adjusted PR: 1.39 [95% CI: 1.14-1.69]) increasing from 12% in 1995 to 15.3% in 2007. Opposite trends were observed for allergies, showing a decline in 2007, with an initial rise. The potential explanations for such a complex disease pattern whose aetiological hypothesis is still evolving are speculative. Changing environmental factors may be a factor, for instance, an improvement in both outdoor and indoor air quality further reinforcing the hygiene hypothesis but obesity as a disease modifier must also be considered. © 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183254
ISSN: 16604601
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8083192
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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