Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020315
Title: A physical health profile of youths living with a “hikikomori” lifestyle
Authors: Yuen, J.W.M
Yan, Y.K.Y
Wong, V.C.W
Tam, W.W.S 
So, K.-W
Chien, W.-T
Keywords: body mass
health risk
health status
hypertension
lifestyle
public health
social behavior
young population
adolescent
adult
anthropometry
Article
body mass
body weight
controlled study
cross-sectional study
diastolic blood pressure
female
hikikomori lifestyle
Hong Kong
human
hypertension
incidence
informed consent
lifestyle
male
obesity
prehypertension
questionnaire
sedentary lifestyle
social work
systolic blood pressure
underweight
young adult
blood pressure
health status
hypertension
morphometry
prehypertension
social isolation
China
Hong Kong
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure
Body Weights and Measures
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status
Hong Kong
Humans
Hypertension
Life Style
Male
Prehypertension
Social Isolation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Yuen, J.W.M, Yan, Y.K.Y, Wong, V.C.W, Tam, W.W.S, So, K.-W, Chien, W.-T (2018). A physical health profile of youths living with a “hikikomori” lifestyle. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15 (2) : 315. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020315
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: A cross-sectional study was designed to understand the impacts of “hikikomori” lifestyle on physical health. A total of 104 eligible hikikomori cases were recruited from the social services network of Hong Kong with a mean age of 19.02 ± 3.62 (ranged 13-31) year-old, and had completed the set of questionnaires and a series of anthropometric and physical health measurements. Despite SF36 score of 84.0 indicated good physical functioning in general, participants were lived sedentarily with high incidence of hypertension at 15.4% and prehypertension at 31.7%. Occurrence of hypertension and prehypertension in cases living as hikikomori >6 months were 3 times and 1.5 times higher than those newly onset cases, respectively. The blood pressure levels were correlated with age and all obesity index parameters measured including waist circumference and body mass index. Results also observed a shift of body weight from underweight to overweight and obesity along the hikikomori duration. Half of the hypertensive cases involved the elevation of systolic blood pressure, which suggested higher odds of cardiovascular complications. In conclusion, the hikikomori lifestyle could be a risk behavior that may harm the younger generation physically by promoting obesity and hypertension and probably other chronic illnesses. © 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/182094
ISSN: 16617827
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15020315
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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