Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.2807/ese.15.42.19692-en
Title: A new pandemic influenza A(H1N1) genetic variant predominated in the winter 2010 influenza season in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore
Authors: Barr, I.G
Cui, L
Komadina, N
Lee, R.T
Lin, R.T 
Deng, Y
Caldwell, N
Shaw, R
Maurer-Stroh, S 
Keywords: influenza vaccine
Influenza virus hemagglutinin
membrane antigen
virus sialidase
Influenza virus hemagglutinin
virus antigen
antigenic variation
antigenicity
article
Australia
gene mutation
gene sequence
genetic drift
genetic variability
hemagglutination inhibition test
human
influenza A (H1N1)
Influenza virus A H1N1
New Zealand
nonhuman
pandemic influenza
phylogenetic tree
seasonal variation
sequence analysis
sequence homology
Singapore
single drug dose
taxonomic rank
viral genetics
virus genome
virus strain
virus virulence
winter
Australia
classification
DNA sequence
genetics
immunology
influenza
isolation and purification
mutation
New Zealand
pandemic
phylogeny
season
Singapore
virology
Antigens, Viral
Australia
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human
Mutation
New Zealand
Pandemics
Phylogeny
Seasons
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Singapore
Issue Date: 2010
Citation: Barr, I.G, Cui, L, Komadina, N, Lee, R.T, Lin, R.T, Deng, Y, Caldwell, N, Shaw, R, Maurer-Stroh, S (2010). A new pandemic influenza A(H1N1) genetic variant predominated in the winter 2010 influenza season in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. Eurosurveillance 15 (42) : 1-6. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.2807/ese.15.42.19692-en
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus is of global health concern and is currently the predominant influenza virus subtype circulating in the southern hemisphere 2010 winter. The virus has changed little since it emerged in 2009, however, in this report we describe several genetically distinct changes in the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. These variants were first detected in Singapore in early 2010 and have subsequently spread through Australia and New Zealand. At this stage, these signature changes in the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins have not resulted in significant antigenic changes which might make the current vaccine less effective, but such adaptive mutations should be carefully monitored as the northern hemisphere approaches its winter influenza season.
Source Title: Eurosurveillance
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181687
ISSN: 1025496X
DOI: 10.2807/ese.15.42.19692-en
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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