Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1206.051210
Title: Dengue prevention and 35 years of vector control in Singapore
Authors: Ooi, E.-E 
Goh, K.-T 
Gubler, D.J
Keywords: dengue
disease control
disease surveillance
herd immunity
morbidity
review
Singapore
Southeast Asia
vector control
virus transmission
zoology
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Citation: Ooi, E.-E, Goh, K.-T, Gubler, D.J (2006). Dengue prevention and 35 years of vector control in Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases 12 (6) : 887-893. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1206.051210
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: After a 15-year period of low incidence, dengue has reemerged in Singapore in the past decade. We identify potential causes of this resurgence. A combination of lowered herd immunity, virus transmission outside the home, an increase in the age of infection, and the adoption of a case-reactive approach to vector control contribute to the increased dengue incidence. Singapore's experience with dengue indicates that prevention efforts may not be sustainable. For renewed success, Singapore needs to return to a vector control program that is based on carefully collected entomologic and epidemiologic data. Singapore's taking on a leadership role in strengthening disease surveillance and control in Southeast Asia may also be useful in reducing virus importation.
Source Title: Emerging Infectious Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181065
ISSN: 1080-6040
DOI: 10.3201/eid1206.051210
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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