Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10194-011-0355-z
Title: Auditory hallucinations and migraine of possible brainstem origin
Authors: Lo, Y.L 
Hameed, S 
Rumpel, H
Chan, L.L 
Keywords: amitriptyline
propranolol
add on therapy
adult
article
auditory hallucination
brain damage
case report
cerebral peduncle
differential diagnosis
disease association
disease severity
dizziness
gliosis
headache
human
male
migraine
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
photophobia
priority journal
treatment outcome
Brain Stem
Hallucinations
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Migraine Disorders
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2011
Citation: Lo, Y.L, Hameed, S, Rumpel, H, Chan, L.L (2011). Auditory hallucinations and migraine of possible brainstem origin. Journal of Headache and Pain 12 (5) : 573-575. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10194-011-0355-z
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Background: Concurrence of migraine and hallucinations is extremely rare and the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Methods: We report a 22-year-old man with migraine associated with auditory hallucinations. Concurrent psychotic illness has been excluded. Results: Brain MR scans showed a stable, patchy FLAIR hyperintensity over the posterolateral aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, just below the level of the red nucleus. This was felt to represent an area of gliosis based on the interval stability over 19 months. There was absence of features for aggressive neoplasms, such as lesional high cellular turnover (choline/NAA ratio >1.0) or high cerebral blood volume on advanced MR imaging with MR spectroscopy and dynamic perfusion MR. EEG and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were unremarkable. Conclusions: To our knowledge, there are no reports to date on similar auditory hallucinations in adult migraine patients, as well as with associated MRI brainstem lesions. The peduncular lesion could represent a previous migrainous infarct, and a possible analogy can be drawn from the descriptions of peduncular hallucinosis. Brainstem lesions, particularly in the midbrain and pons, have rarely been associated with this condition. It has been postulated that the damage to ascending reticular systems or thalamocortical circuitry may contribute to its pathogenesis. © 2011 The Author(s).
Source Title: Journal of Headache and Pain
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/180854
ISSN: 1129-2369
DOI: 10.1007/s10194-011-0355-z
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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