Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2015-3591
Title: Iodine supplementation of mildly iodine-deficient adults lowers thyroglobulin: A randomized controlled trial
Authors: Ma, Z.F
Venn, B.J
Manning, P.J 
Cameron, C.M
Skeaff, S.A
Keywords: placebo
potassium iodate
thyroglobulin
thyrotropin
thyroxine
iodine
thyroglobulin
thyrotropin
thyroxine
adult
Article
cohort analysis
controlled study
double blind procedure
female
hormone determination
human
informed consent
iodine deficiency
male
New Zealand
randomized controlled trial
thyrotropin blood level
thyroxine blood level
urinalysis
urinary iodine concentration
urine level
adolescent
blood
deficiency
dietary supplement
treatment outcome
urine
young adult
Adolescent
Adult
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Iodine
Male
Thyroglobulin
Thyrotropin
Thyroxine
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Endocrine Society
Citation: Ma, Z.F, Venn, B.J, Manning, P.J, Cameron, C.M, Skeaff, S.A (2016). Iodine supplementation of mildly iodine-deficient adults lowers thyroglobulin: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 101 (4) : 1737-1744. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2015-3591
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Context: An inverse relationship between thyroglobulin (Tg) and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) has been found in children, potentially making Tg a viable blood marker of iodine status. The application of Tg in adults is unknown. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of Tg to assess iodine status in adults. Design: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted in Dunedin, New Zealand. Participants: Mildly iodine deficient adults (n = 112) aged 18-40 years participated in the study. Intervention: Participants were supplemented with 150 μg of iodine as potassium iodate or placebo daily for 24 weeks. At baseline and 24 weeks, participants provided five casual urine samples for UIC determination; serum TSH and free T4 (FT4) was also measured. Tg was determined at baseline and 8, 16, and 24 weeks. Main Outcome Measure: A change in Tg concentration between the iodine-supplemented and placebo groups at 24 weeks. Results: At baseline, the overall median UIC was 65 μg/L, confirming that participants were mildly iodine deficient (ie, median UIC between 50 and 99 μg/L). The overall median Tg was 16.6 μg/L; TSH and FT4 were within normal reference ranges. At 24 weeks, the median UIC of the placebo and supplemented groups was significantly different, 79 and 168 μg/L, respectively (P < .001). Tg in the iodine-supplemented group decreased by 12%, 20%, and 27% compared with the placebo group at 8 (P = .045), 16 (P < .001), and 24 weeks (P < .001); there were no significant changes in TSH and FT4. Conclusion: Improved iodine status as assessed by UIC was associated with a concomitant decrease in Tg concentration, demonstrating that Tg is a useful biomarker of iodine status in a group of adults. Copyright © 2016 by the Endocrine Society.
Source Title: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179585
ISSN: 0021-972X
DOI: 10.1210/jc.2015-3591
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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