Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00312-1
Title: Serial processing of kinematic signals by cerebellar circuitry during voluntary whisking
Authors: Chen, S
Augustine, G.J 
Chadderton, P
Keywords: brain
cells and cell components
inhibitor
kinematics
molecular analysis
nervous system
animal behavior
animal experiment
Article
cell population
cerebellum
cerebellum cortex
cerebellum molecular layer
current clamp technique
downstream processing
electrophysiological procedures
excitatory postsynaptic potential
female
firing rate
granule cell
in vivo study
interneuron
kinematics
male
mouse
movement (physiology)
nerve cell membrane steady potential
nerve cell stimulation
neuromodulation
nonhuman
patch clamp technique
Purkinje cell
signal processing
synaptic inhibition
tuning curve
voltage clamp technique
voluntary movement
whisker movement
animal
C57BL mouse
cell culture
cerebellum
chemistry
cytology
electrophysiology
nerve cell
physiology
Animals
Cells, Cultured
Cerebellum
Electrophysiology
Interneurons
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neurons
Purkinje Cells
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Chen, S, Augustine, G.J, Chadderton, P (2017). Serial processing of kinematic signals by cerebellar circuitry during voluntary whisking. Nature Communications 8 (1) : 312. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00312-1
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Purkinje cells (PCs) in Crus 1 represent whisker movement via linear changes in firing rate, but the circuit mechanisms underlying this coding scheme are unknown. Here we examine the role of upstream inputs to PCs - excitatory granule cells (GCs) and inhibitory molecular layer interneurons - in processing of whisking signals. Patch clamp recordings in GCs reveal that movement is accompanied by changes in mossy fibre input rate that drive membrane potential depolarisation and high-frequency bursting activity at preferred whisker angles. Although individual GCs are narrowly tuned, GC populations provide linear excitatory drive across a wide range of movement. Molecular layer interneurons exhibit bidirectional firing rate changes during whisking, similar to PCs. Together, GC populations provide downstream PCs with linear representations of volitional movement, while inhibitory networks invert these signals. The exquisite sensitivity of neurons at each processing stage enables faithful propagation of kinematic representations through the cerebellum. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178593
ISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00312-1
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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