Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.31659
Title: Neurexin and neuroligin-based adhesion complexes drive axonal arborisation growth independent of synaptic activity
Authors: Constance, W.D
Mukherjee, A
Fisher, Y.E
Pop, S
Blanc, E
Toyama, Y 
Williams, D.W
Keywords: enhanced green fluorescent protein
neurexin
neuroligin
neurotransmitter receptor
Drosophila protein
nerve cell adhesion molecule
neuroligin 1
Nrx protein, Drosophila
protein binding
adult
animal cell
animal experiment
Article
axon
cell adhesion
controlled study
Drosophila
female
gene expression
immunocytochemistry
immunohistochemistry
metamorphosis
nerve cell differentiation
nerve cell growth
nerve cell network
nonhuman
synapse
animal
brain
cell adhesion
embryology
gene knockout
genetics
metabolism
morphogenesis
nerve cell
physiology
Animals
Brain
Cell Adhesion
Cell Adhesion Molecules, Neuronal
Drosophila
Drosophila Proteins
Gene Knockout Techniques
Morphogenesis
Neurons
Protein Binding
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Constance, W.D, Mukherjee, A, Fisher, Y.E, Pop, S, Blanc, E, Toyama, Y, Williams, D.W (2018). Neurexin and neuroligin-based adhesion complexes drive axonal arborisation growth independent of synaptic activity. eLife 7 : e31659. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.31659
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Building arborisations of the right size and shape is fundamental for neural network function. Live imaging in vertebrate brains strongly suggests that nascent synapses are critical for branch growth during development. The molecular mechanisms underlying this are largely unknown. Here we present a novel system in Drosophila for studying the development of complex arborisations live, in vivo during metamorphosis. In growing arborisations we see branch dynamics and localisations of presynaptic proteins very similar to the ‘synaptotropic growth’ described in fish/frogs. These accumulations of presynaptic proteins do not appear to be presynaptic release sites and are not paired with neurotransmitter receptors. Knockdowns of either evoked or spontaneous neurotransmission do not impact arbor growth. Instead, we find that axonal branch growth is regulated by dynamic, focal localisations of Neurexin and Neuroligin. These adhesion complexes provide stability for filopodia by a ‘stick-and-grow’ based mechanism wholly independent of synaptic activity. © Constance et al.
Source Title: eLife
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178254
ISSN: 2050084X
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.31659
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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