Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12937-018-0340-3
Title: Gene-diet interaction effects on BMI levels in the Singapore Chinese population
Authors: Chang X. 
Dorajoo R. 
Sun Y. 
Han Y. 
Wang L.
Khor C.-C. 
Sim X. 
Tai E.-S. 
Liu J. 
Yuan J.-M
Koh W.-P. 
Van Dam R.M. 
Friedlander Y. 
Heng C.-K. 
Keywords: adult
aged
Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 score
Article
body mass
case control study
CCDC171 gene
Chinese
cholesterol intake
cohort analysis
controlled study
dietary intake
female
gene
gene identification
gene interaction
gene locus
genetic association
genetic risk
genome-wide association study
genotype
human
major clinical study
male
nutritional parameters
obesity
population based case control study
population genetics
population research
prospective study
quality control procedures
risk assessment
risk factor
scoring system
Singapore
single nucleotide polymorphism
weighted gene risk score
administration and dosage
Asian continental ancestry group
cross-sectional study
diet
genetics
genotype
genotype environment interaction
meta analysis
middle aged
obesity
quantitative trait locus
red meat
very elderly
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Body Mass Index
Cholesterol, Dietary
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Quantitative Trait Loci
Red Meat
Singapore
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Chang X., Dorajoo R., Sun Y., Han Y., Wang L., Khor C.-C., Sim X., Tai E.-S., Liu J., Yuan J.-M, Koh W.-P., Van Dam R.M., Friedlander Y., Heng C.-K. (2018). Gene-diet interaction effects on BMI levels in the Singapore Chinese population. Nutrition Journal 17 (1) : 31. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12937-018-0340-3
Abstract: Background: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 97 body-mass index (BMI) associated loci. We aimed to evaluate if dietary intake modifies BMI associations at these loci in the Singapore Chinese population. Methods: We utilized GWAS information from six data subsets from two adult Chinese population (N = 7817). Seventy-eight genotyped or imputed index BMI single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that passed quality control procedures were available in all datasets. Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010 score and ten nutrient variables were evaluated. Linear regression analyses between z score transformed BMI (Z-BMI) and dietary factors were performed. Interaction analyses were performed by introducing the interaction term (diet x SNP) in the same regression model. Analysis was carried out in each cohort individually and subsequently meta-analyzed using the inverse-variance weighted method. Analyses were also evaluated with a weighted gene-risk score (wGRS) contructed by BMI index SNPs from recent large-scale GWAS studies. Results: Nominal associations between Z-BMI and AHEI-2010 and some dietary factors were identified (P = 0.047-0.010). The BMI wGRS was robustly associated with Z-BMI (P = 1.55 × 10- 15) but not with any dietary variables. Dietary variables did not significantly interact with the wGRS to modify BMI associations. When interaction analyses were repeated using individual SNPs, a significant association between cholesterol intake and rs4740619 (CCDC171) was identified (? = 0.077, adjPinteraction = 0.043). Conclusions: The CCDC171 gene locus may interact with cholesterol intake to increase BMI in the Singaporean Chinese population, however most known obesity risk loci were not associated with dietary intake and did not interact with diet to modify BMI levels. © 2018 The Author(s).
Source Title: Nutrition Journal
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175401
ISSN: 1475-2891
DOI: 10.1186/s12937-018-0340-3
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