Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-019-3705-0
Title: Sub-clinical abnormalities detected by PET/MRI in household tuberculosis contacts
Authors: Molton, J.S 
Thomas, B.A
Pang, Y
Khor, L.K
Hallinan, J
Naftalin, C.M
Totman, J.J 
Townsend, D.W 
Lim, T.K 
Chee, C.B.E
Wang, Y.T
Paton, N.I 
Keywords: fluorodeoxyglucose f 18
isoniazid
fluorodeoxyglucose f 18
radiopharmaceutical agent
adult
aged
Article
clinical article
clinical assessment
controlled study
coughing
disease duration
exposure
female
hilar lymph node
household
household contact
human
interferon gamma release assay
lung disease
lung nodule
lymph node
male
maximum standardized uptake value
mediastinum lymph node
metabolic disorder
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
positron emission tomography
subclinical lung abnormality
thorax radiography
tuberculosis
contact examination
diagnostic imaging
family size
lung tuberculosis
middle aged
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
pathology
positron emission tomography
transmission
young adult
Adult
Aged
Contact Tracing
Family Characteristics
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Lymph Nodes
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Positron-Emission Tomography
Radiopharmaceuticals
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2019
Citation: Molton, J.S, Thomas, B.A, Pang, Y, Khor, L.K, Hallinan, J, Naftalin, C.M, Totman, J.J, Townsend, D.W, Lim, T.K, Chee, C.B.E, Wang, Y.T, Paton, N.I (2019). Sub-clinical abnormalities detected by PET/MRI in household tuberculosis contacts. BMC Infectious Diseases 19 (1) : 3705. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-019-3705-0
Abstract: Background: The understanding of early events following TB exposure is limited by traditional tests that rely on detection of an immune response to infection, which is delayed, or on imaging tests with low sensitivity for early disease. We investigated for evidence of lung abnormalities in heavily exposed TB contacts using PET/MRI. Methods: 30 household contacts of 20 index patients underwent clinical assessment, IGRA testing, chest x-ray and PET/MRI scan using 18-F-FDG. MRI images were examined by a radiology/nuclear medicine dual-qualified physician using a standardised report form, while PET/MRI images were examined independently by another radiology/nuclear medicine dual-qualified physician using a similar form. Standardised uptake value (SUV) was quantified for each abnormal lesion. Results: IGRA was positive in 40%. PET/MRI scan was abnormal in 30%, predominantly FDG uptake in hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes and lung apices. We did not identify any relationship between PET/MRI findings and degree of exposure or IGRA status. Conclusion: PET-based imaging may provide important insights into the natural history following exposure to TB that may not be available from traditional tests of TB immune response or imaging. The clinical significance of the abnormalities is uncertain and merits further investigation in longitudinal studies. © 2019 The Author(s).
Source Title: BMC Infectious Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175340
ISSN: 1471-2334
DOI: 10.1186/s12879-019-3705-0
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