Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/s150819466
Title: A high performance delta-sigma modulator for neurosensing
Authors: Xu J. 
Zhao M.
Wu X.
Islam M.K.
Yang Z. 
Keywords: Analog integrated circuits
CMOS integrated circuits
Data acquisition
Delta sigma modulation
Electric discharges
Electromagnetic pulse
Operational amplifiers
Signal to noise ratio
Surface discharges
Delta sigma modulator
Dynamic range
Quantizers
Sensor interface
Switched op-amp
Modulators
action potential
analog digital converter
animal
computer simulation
devices
electricity
epilepsy
human
neuroscience
physiologic monitoring
physiology
procedures
rat
semiconductor
signal noise ratio
wireless communication
Action Potentials
Analog-Digital Conversion
Animals
Computer Simulation
Electricity
Epilepsy
Humans
Monitoring, Physiologic
Neurosciences
Rats
Semiconductors
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Wireless Technology
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: MDPI AG
Citation: Xu J., Zhao M., Wu X., Islam M.K., Yang Z. (2015). A high performance delta-sigma modulator for neurosensing. Sensors (Switzerland) 15 (8) : 19466-19486. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/s150819466
Abstract: Recorded neural data are frequently corrupted by large amplitude artifacts that are triggered by a variety of sources, such as subject movements, organ motions, electromagnetic interferences and discharges at the electrode surface. To prevent the system from saturating and the electronics from malfunctioning due to these large artifacts, a wide dynamic range for data acquisition is demanded, which is quite challenging to achieve and would require excessive circuit area and power for implementation. In this paper, we present a high performance Delta-Sigma modulator along with several design techniques and enabling blocks to reduce circuit area and power. The modulator was fabricated in a 0.18-µm CMOS process. Powered by a 1.0-V supply, the chip can achieve an 85-dB peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) and an 87-dB dynamic range when integrated over a 10-kHz bandwidth. The total power consumption of the modulator is 13 µW, which corresponds to a figure-of-merit (FOM) of 45 fJ/conversion step. These competitive circuit specifications make this design a good candidate for building high precision neurosensors. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: Sensors (Switzerland)
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175285
ISSN: 1424-8220
DOI: 10.3390/s150819466
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