Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12312
Title: Clinical differences between respiratory viral and bacterial mono- and dual pathogen detected among Singapore military servicemen with febrile respiratory illness
Authors: Ho, Z.J.M
Zhao, X 
Cook, A.R 
Loh, J.P
Ng, S.H
Tan, B.H
Lee, V.J 
Keywords: Adenoviridae
adolescent
adult
arthralgia
Article
asthma
bacterial infection
bacterium detection
body temperature
chill
clinical feature
controlled study
coughing
febrile respiratory illness
Haemophilus influenzae
headache
human
Influenza virus A
Influenza virus B
major clinical study
male
mixed infection
Mycoplasma
nonhuman
nose smear
pneumonia
priority journal
respiratory tract disease
rigor
Singapore
soldier
sore throat
Streptococcus pneumoniae
viral respiratory tract infection
virus detection
Bacterial Infections
bacterium
female
fever
genetics
Influenza, Human
isolation and purification
microbiology
middle aged
Respiratory Tract Infections
statistics and numerical data
virology
virus
young adult
Adolescent
Adult
Bacteria
Bacterial Infections
Female
Fever
Humans
Influenza, Human
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Respiratory Tract Infections
Singapore
Viruses
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Ho, Z.J.M, Zhao, X, Cook, A.R, Loh, J.P, Ng, S.H, Tan, B.H, Lee, V.J (2015). Clinical differences between respiratory viral and bacterial mono- and dual pathogen detected among Singapore military servicemen with febrile respiratory illness. Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses 9 (4) : 200-208. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12312
Abstract: Background: Although it is known that febrile respiratory illnesses (FRI) may be caused by multiple respiratory pathogens, there are no population-level studies describing its impact on clinical disease. Methods: Between May 2009 and October 2012, 7733 FRI patients and controls in the Singapore military had clinical data and nasal wash samples collected prospectively and sent for PCR testing. Patients with one pathogen detected (mono-pathogen) were compared with those with two pathogens (dual pathogen) for differences in basic demographics and clinical presentation. Results: In total, 45.8% had one pathogen detected, 20.2% had two pathogens detected, 30.9% had no pathogens detected, and 3.1% had more than two pathogens. Multiple pathogens were associated with recruits, those with asthma and non-smokers. Influenza A (80.0%), influenza B (73.0%) and mycoplasma (70.6%) were most commonly associated with mono-infections, while adenovirus was most commonly associated with dual infections (62.9%). Influenza A paired with S. pneumoniae had higher proportions of chills and rigors than their respective mono-pathogens (P = 0.03, P = 0.009). H. influenzae paired with either enterovirus or parainfluenzae had higher proportions of cough with phlegm than their respective mono-pathogens. Although there were observed differences in mean proportions of body temperature, nasal symptoms, sore throat, body aches and joint pains between viral and bacterial mono-pathogens, there were few differences between distinct dual-pathogen pairs and their respective mono-pathogen counterparts. Conclusion: A substantial number of FRI patients have multiple pathogens detected. Observed clinical differences between patients of dual pathogen and mono-pathogen indicate the likely presence of complex microbial interactions between the various pathogens. © 2015 The Authors.
Source Title: Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/174124
ISSN: 17502640
DOI: 10.1111/irv.12312
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