Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-017-0515-x
Title: Determinants of eating at local and western fast-food venues in an urban Asian population: A mixed methods approach
Authors: Naidoo, N.
van Dam, R.M 
Ng, S 
Tan, C.S.
Chen, S.
Lim, J.Y.
Chan, M.F
Chew, L 
Rebello, S.A 
Keywords: catering service
controlled study
driver
eating
ethnicity
fast food
female
food quality
human
Indian
major clinical study
male
meal
nutrition
Singaporean
workplace
adult
Asian continental ancestry group
catering service
diet
ethnic group
family size
feeding behavior
food preference
information processing
middle aged
nutritional status
Singapore
statistics and numerical data
urban population
Western diet
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Diet
Diet, Western
Eating
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Fast Foods
Feeding Behavior
Female
Focus Groups
Food Preferences
Food Quality
Humans
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Restaurants
Singapore
Urban Population
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Citation: Naidoo, N., van Dam, R.M, Ng, S, Tan, C.S., Chen, S., Lim, J.Y., Chan, M.F, Chew, L, Rebello, S.A (2017). Determinants of eating at local and western fast-food venues in an urban Asian population: A mixed methods approach. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 14 (1) : 69. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-017-0515-x
Abstract: Background: Like several Southeast Asian countries, Singapore has a complex eating-out environment and a rising eating-out prevalence. However the determinants and drivers of eating-out in urban Asian environments are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the socio-demographic characteristics of persons who frequently ate away from home in local eateries called hawker centres and Western fast-food restaurants, using data from 1647 Singaporean adults participating in the National Nutrition Survey (NNS) 2010. We also assessed the underlying drivers of eating out and evaluated if these were different for eating at local eateries compared to Western fast-food restaurants using 18 focus group discussions of women (130 women). Results: Participants reported a high eating-out frequency with 77.3% usually eating either breakfast, lunch or dinner at eateries. Main venues for eating-out included hawker centres (61.1% usually ate at least 1 of 3 daily meals at this venue) and school/workplace canteens (20.4%). A minority of participants (1.9%) reported usually eating at Western fast-food restaurants. Younger participants and those of Chinese and Malay ethnicity compared to Indians were more likely to eat at Western fast-food restaurants. Chinese and employed persons were more likely to eat at hawker centres. The ready availability of a large variety of affordable and appealing foods appeared to be a primary driver of eating out, particularly at hawker centres. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the growing importance of eating-out in an urban Asian population where local eating venues play a more dominant role compared with Western fast-food chains. Interventions focusing on improving the food quality at venues for eating out are important to improve the diet of urban Asian populations. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/173843
ISSN: 14795868
DOI: 10.1186/s12966-017-0515-x
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