Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194878
Title: Working memory, age and education: A lifespan fMRI study
Authors: Archer J.A.
Lee A. 
Qiu A. 
Chen S.-H.A.
Keywords: adult
aged
aging
article
cognitive reserve
compensation
cuneus
education
episodic memory
female
functional magnetic resonance imaging
gray matter
human
human experiment
lifespan
major clinical study
male
temporal gyrus
working memory
young adult
aging
behavior
brain
brain mapping
diagnostic imaging
educational status
middle aged
neuropsychological test
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
physiology
short term memory
spatial analysis
task performance
Adult
Aged
Aging
Behavior
Brain
Brain Mapping
Educational Status
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Memory, Short-Term
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Spatial Analysis
Task Performance and Analysis
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Archer J.A., Lee A., Qiu A., Chen S.-H.A. (2018). Working memory, age and education: A lifespan fMRI study. PLoS ONE 13 (3) : e0194878. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194878
Abstract: Ageing is associated with grey matter atrophy and changes in task-related neural activations. This study investigated the effects of age and education on neural activation during a spatial working memory task in 189 participants aged between 20-80 years old, whilst controlling for grey matter density. Age was related to linear decreases in neural activation in task activated areas, and this effect was no longer significant when adjusting for education or accuracy. Age was also related to cubic increases in neural activation in non-task related areas, such as the temporal gyrus, cuneus and cerebellum when adjusting for accuracy and education. These findings support previous lifespan datasets indicating linear age-related decreases in task activation, but non-linear increases in non-task related areas during episodic memory tasks. The findings also support past studies indicating education offers a form of cognitive reserve through providing a form of neural compensation and highlights the need to consider education in ageing studies. © 2018 Archer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165906
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194878
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