Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0187098
Title: Effects of total sleep deprivation on divided attention performance
Authors: Chua E.C.-P. 
Fang E.
Gooley J.J. 
Keywords: adult
attention
clinical article
deterioration
eye tracking
human
male
occupation
response time
sleep deprivation
task performance
wakefulness
young adult
attention
auditory stimulation
motor activity
pathophysiology
physiology
sleep deprivation
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Attention
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Sleep Deprivation
Task Performance and Analysis
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Chua E.C.-P., Fang E., Gooley J.J. (2017). Effects of total sleep deprivation on divided attention performance. PLoS ONE 12 (11) : e0187098. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0187098
Abstract: Dividing attention across two tasks performed simultaneously usually results in impaired performance on one or both tasks. Most studies have found no difference in the dual-task cost of dividing attention in rested and sleep-deprived states. We hypothesized that, for a divided attention task that is highly cognitively-demanding, performance would show greater impairment during exposure to sleep deprivation. A group of 30 healthy males aged 21–30 years was exposed to 40 h of continuous wakefulness in a laboratory setting. Every 2 h, subjects completed a divided attention task comprising 3 blocks in which an auditory Go/No-Go task was 1) performed alone (single task); 2) performed simultaneously with a visual Go/No-Go task (dual task); and 3) performed simultaneously with both a visual Go/No-Go task and a visually-guided motor tracking task (triple task). Performance on all tasks showed substantial deterioration during exposure to sleep deprivation. A significant interaction was observed between task load and time since wake on auditory Go/No-Go task performance, with greater impairment in response times and accuracy during extended wakefulness. Our results suggest that the ability to divide attention between multiple tasks is impaired during exposure to sleep deprivation. These findings have potential implications for occupations that require multi-tasking combined with long work hours and exposure to sleep loss. © 2017 Chua et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165769
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187098
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1371_journal_pone_0187098.pdf2.5 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

15
checked on Nov 27, 2021

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

12
checked on Oct 4, 2021

Page view(s)

153
checked on Nov 18, 2021

Download(s)

2
checked on Nov 18, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.