Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0143587
Title: Occupational Exposure to Swine, Poultry, and Cattle and Antibody Biomarkers of Campylobacter jejuni Exposure and Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathy
Authors: Vegosen L.
Breysse P.N.
Agnew J.
Gray G.C. 
Nachamkin I.
Sheikh K.
Kamel F.
Silbergeld E.
Keywords: bacterium antibody
ganglioside antibody
ganglioside GD1a antibody
ganglioside GD1b antibody
ganglioside GM1 antibody
ganglioside GQ 1b antibody
immunoglobulin A antibody
immunoglobulin G antibody
immunoglobulin M antibody
unclassified drug
autoantibody
ganglioside
adult
agricultural worker
antibody detection
Article
autoimmune disease
autoimmune peripheral neuropathy
bovine
Campylobacter jejuni
controlled study
female
herd
human
major clinical study
male
occupational exposure
peripheral neuropathy
pig
poultry
questionnaire
United States
analysis
animal
Campylobacter jejuni
campylobacteriosis
comparative study
food control
immunology
longitudinal study
microbiology
neurologic disease
occupational exposure
peripheral neuropathy
statistics and numerical data
Animals
Autoantibodies
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Campylobacter Infections
Campylobacter jejuni
Cattle
Female
Food Microbiology
Gangliosides
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Occupational Exposure
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Poultry
Swine
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Vegosen L., Breysse P.N., Agnew J., Gray G.C., Nachamkin I., Sheikh K., Kamel F., Silbergeld E. (2015). Occupational Exposure to Swine, Poultry, and Cattle and Antibody Biomarkers of Campylobacter jejuni Exposure and Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathy. PLoS ONE 10 (12) : e0143587. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0143587
Abstract: Introduction: Foodborne Campylobacter jejuni infection has been associated with an increased risk of autoimmune peripheral neuropathy, but risks of occupational exposure to C. jejuni have received less attention. This study compared anti-C. jejuni IgA, IgG, and IgM antibody levels, as well as the likelihood of testing positive for any of five anti-ganglioside autoantibodies, between animal farmers and non-farmers. Anti-C. jejuni antibody levels were also compared between farmers with different animal herd or flock sizes. The relationship between anti-C. jejuni antibody levels and detection of anti-ganglioside autoantibodies was also assessed. Methods: Serum samples from 129 Agricultural Health Study swine farmers (some of whom also worked with other animals) and 46 non-farmers, all from Iowa, were analyzed for anti-C. jejuni antibodies and anti-ganglioside autoantibodies using ELISA. Information on animal exposures was assessed using questionnaire data. Anti-C. jejuni antibody levels were compared using Mann-Whitney tests and linear regression on log-transformed outcomes. Fisher's Exact Tests and logistic regression were used to compare likelihood of positivity for anti-ganglioside autoantibodies. Results: Farmers had significantly higher levels of anti-C. jejuni IgA (p < 0.0001) and IgG (p = 0.02) antibodies compared to non-farmers. There was no consistent pattern of anti-C. jejuni antibody levels based on animal herd or flock size. A higher percentage of farmers (21%) tested positive for anti-ganglioside autoantibodies compared to non-farmers (9%), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.11). There was no significant association between anti-C. jejuni antibody levels and anti-ganglioside autoantibodies. Conclusions: The findings provide evidence that farmers who work with animals may be at increased risk of exposure to C. jejuni. Future research should include longitudinal studies of exposures and outcomes, as well as studies of interventions to reduce exposure. Policies to reduce occupational exposure to C. jejuni should be considered. © 2015, Public Library of Science. All rights reserved. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165758
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0143587
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