Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000521
Title: A tether for Woronin body inheritance is associated with evolutionary variation in organelle positioning
Authors: Ng S.K.
Liu F.
Lai J.
Low W.
Jedd G. 
Keywords: fungal protein
hybrid protein
leashin
membrane protein
unclassified drug
WSC protein
fungal protein
amino terminal sequence
article
carboxy terminal sequence
cell organelle
cellular distribution
controlled study
fungus growth
fungus hyphae
gene identification
gene locus
genetic code
inheritance
molecular evolution
Neurospora
nonhuman
protein binding
woronin body
genetics
growth, development and aging
metabolism
molecular evolution
Neurospora crassa
Ascomycota
Eukaryota
Fungi
Neurospora
Evolution, Molecular
Fungal Proteins
Hyphae
Neurospora crassa
Organelles
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Ng S.K., Liu F., Lai J., Low W., Jedd G. (2009). A tether for Woronin body inheritance is associated with evolutionary variation in organelle positioning. PLoS Genetics 5 (6) : e1000521. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000521
Abstract: Eukaryotic organelles evolve to support the lifestyle of evolutionarily related organisms. In the fungi, filamentous Ascomycetes possess dense-core organelles called Woronin bodies (WBs). These organelles originate from peroxisomes and perform an adaptive function to seal septal pores in response to cellular wounding. Here, we identify Leashin, an organellar tether required for WB inheritance, and associate it with evolutionary variation in the subcellular pattern of WB distribution. In Neurospora, the leashin (lah) locus encodes two related adjacent genes. N-terminal sequences of LAH-1 bind WBs via the WB-specific membrane protein WSC, and C-terminal sequences are required for WB inheritance by cell cortex association. LAH-2 is localized to the hyphal apex and septal pore rim and plays a role in colonial growth. In most species, WBs are tethered directly to the pore rim, however, Neurospora and relatives have evolved a delocalized pattern of cortex association. Using a new method for the construction of chromosomally encoded fusion proteins, marker fusion tagging (MFT), we show that a LAH-1/LAH-2 fusion can reproduce the ancestral pattern in Neurospora. Our results identify the link between the WB and cell cortex and suggest that splitting of leashin played a key role in the adaptive evolution of organelle localization. © 2009 Ng et al.
Source Title: PLoS Genetics
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165421
ISSN: 15537390
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000521
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