Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0004912
Title: Rheopathologic Consequence of Plasmodium vivax Rosette Formation
Authors: Zhang R. 
Lee W.-C.
Lau Y.-L.
Albrecht L.
Lopes S.C.P.
Costa F.T.M.
Suwanarusk R.
Nosten F.
Cooke B.M.
Rénia L. 
Russell B. 
Keywords: adhesion
chemical binding
discocyte
membrane
microvasculature
nonhuman
Plasmodium vivax
rosette formation
schizont
shear flow
spleen
stress
animal
blood
blood rheology
erythrocyte
erythrocyte deformability
erythrocyte membrane
human
immunology
metabolism
microfluidic analysis
parasitology
pathogenicity
pathology
physiology
Plasmodium vivax
Plasmodium vivax malaria
ultrastructure
vascularization
Young modulus
Animals
Elastic Modulus
Erythrocyte Deformability
Erythrocyte Membrane
Erythrocytes
Hemorheology
Humans
Malaria, Vivax
Microfluidic Analytical Techniques
Plasmodium vivax
Rosette Formation
Spleen
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Zhang R., Lee W.-C., Lau Y.-L., Albrecht L., Lopes S.C.P., Costa F.T.M., Suwanarusk R., Nosten F., Cooke B.M., Rénia L., Russell B. (2016). Rheopathologic Consequence of Plasmodium vivax Rosette Formation. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 10 (8) : e0004912. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0004912
Abstract: Malaria parasites dramatically alter the rheological properties of infected red blood cells. In the case of Plasmodium vivax, the parasite rapidly decreases the shear elastic modulus of the invaded RBC, enabling it to avoid splenic clearance. This study highlights correlation between rosette formation and altered membrane deformability of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes, where the rosette-forming infected erythrocytes are significantly more rigid than their non-rosetting counterparts. The adhesion of normocytes to the PvIRBC is strong (mean binding force of 440pN) resulting in stable rosette formation even under high physiological shear flow stress. Rosetting may contribute to the sequestration of PvIRBC schizonts in the host microvasculature or spleen. © 2016 Zhang et al.
Source Title: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165382
ISSN: 19352727
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004912
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