Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003019
Title: Evolutionarily Ancient Association of the FoxJ1 Transcription Factor with the Motile Ciliogenic Program
Authors: Vij S.
Rink J.C.
Ho H.K.
Babu D. 
Eitel M.
Narasimhan V.
Tiku V.
Westbrook J.
Schierwater B.
Roy S. 
Keywords: transcription factor
transcription factor FoxJ1
unclassified drug
article
biogenesis
cell differentiation
cell migration
ciliary motility
controlled study
embryo
eukaryotic cell
gene
gene inactivation
genetic conservation
human
last common ancestor
molecular genetics
mouse
nonhuman
nucleotide sequence
Opisthokonta
phylogeny
platyhelminth
protein analysis
Schmidtea mediterranea
Strongylocentrotus
transcription factor FoxJ1 gene
transcription regulation
zebra fish
Animals
Biological Evolution
Cell Differentiation
Cell Movement
Cilia
Forkhead Transcription Factors
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
Morphogenesis
Vertebrates
Zebrafish
Danio rerio
Eukaryota
Metazoa
Platyhelminthes
Schmidtea mediterranea
Vertebrata
Issue Date: 2012
Citation: Vij S., Rink J.C., Ho H.K., Babu D., Eitel M., Narasimhan V., Tiku V., Westbrook J., Schierwater B., Roy S. (2012). Evolutionarily Ancient Association of the FoxJ1 Transcription Factor with the Motile Ciliogenic Program. PLoS Genetics 8 (11) : e1003019. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003019
Abstract: It is generally believed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was a unicellular organism with motile cilia. In the vertebrates, the winged-helix transcription factor FoxJ1 functions as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Despite the antiquity of cilia, their highly conserved structure, and their mechanism of motility, the evolution of the transcriptional program controlling ciliogenesis has remained incompletely understood. In particular, it is presently not known how the generation of motile cilia is programmed outside of the vertebrates, and whether and to what extent the FoxJ1-dependent regulation is conserved. We have performed a survey of numerous eukaryotic genomes and discovered that genes homologous to foxJ1 are restricted only to organisms belonging to the unikont lineage. Using a mis-expression assay, we then obtained evidence of a conserved ability of FoxJ1 proteins from a number of diverse phyletic groups to activate the expression of a host of motile ciliary genes in zebrafish embryos. Conversely, we found that inactivation of a foxJ1 gene in Schmidtea mediterranea, a platyhelminth (flatworm) that utilizes motile cilia for locomotion, led to a profound disruption in the differentiation of motile cilia. Together, all of these findings provide the first evolutionary perspective into the transcriptional control of motile ciliogenesis and allow us to propose a conserved FoxJ1-regulated mechanism for motile cilia biogenesis back to the origin of the metazoans. © 2012 Vij et al.
Source Title: PLoS Genetics
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161632
ISSN: 15537390
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003019
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1371_journal_pgen_1003019.pdf4.83 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

21
checked on Jun 27, 2020

Page view(s)

60
checked on Jul 2, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.