Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2018.11.014
Title: Calcium-mediated Protein Folding and Stabilization of Salmonella Biofilm-associated Protein A
Authors: YAO, MINGXI 
BAKER, KAREN
YANG, LIANG
GOULT, BENJAMIN T
DOYLE, PATRICK S
YAN, JIE 
GUTTULA DURGARAO 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
magnetic tweezers
calcium-binding protein
mechanical stability of proteins
biofilm-associated protein, Salmonella
BACTERIAL ADHESION
MAGNETIC TWEEZERS
BAP
EXCHANGE
ENTERICA
BINDING
FAMILY
FORCES
Issue Date: 18-Jan-2019
Publisher: ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation: YAO, MINGXI, BAKER, KAREN, YANG, LIANG, GOULT, BENJAMIN T, DOYLE, PATRICK S, YAN, JIE, GUTTULA DURGARAO (2019-01-18). Calcium-mediated Protein Folding and Stabilization of Salmonella Biofilm-associated Protein A. Journal of Molecular Biology 431 (2) : 433-443. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2018.11.014
Abstract: Biofilm-associated proteins (BAPs) are important for early biofilm formation (adhesion) by bacteria and are also found in mature biofilms. BapA from Salmonella is a ~ 386-kDa surface protein, comprising 27 tandem repeats predicted to be bacterial Ig-like (BIg) domains. Such tandem repeats are conserved for BAPs across different bacterial species, but the function of these domains is not completely understood. In this work, we report the first study of the mechanical stability of the BapA protein. Using magnetic tweezers, we show that the folding of BapA BIg domains requires calcium binding and the folded domains have differential mechanical stabilities. Importantly, we identify that > 100 nM concentration of calcium is needed for folding of the BIg domains, and the stability of the folded BIg domains is regulated by calcium over a wide concentration range from sub-micromolar (μM) to millimolar (mM). Only at mM calcium concentrations, as found in the extracellular environment, do the BIg domains have the saturated mechanical stability. BapA has been suggested to be involved in Salmonella invasion, and it is likely a crucial mechanical component of biofilms. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the potential roles of BapA as a structural maintenance component of Salmonella biofilm and also Salmonella invasion.
Source Title: Journal of Molecular Biology
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/155377
ISSN: 00222836
10898638
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmb.2018.11.014
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