Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.14893
DC FieldValue
dc.titleGlutathione catabolism by Enterobacteriaceae species to hydrogen sulphide adversely affects the viability of host systems in the presence of 5 ' fluorodeoxyuridine
dc.contributor.authorLim, Daniel Rui Xiang
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yahua
dc.contributor.authorNg, Li Fang
dc.contributor.authorGruber, Jan
dc.contributor.authorGan, Yunn-Hwen
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-24T10:17:26Z
dc.date.available2023-03-24T10:17:26Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-22
dc.identifier.citationLim, Daniel Rui Xiang, Chen, Yahua, Ng, Li Fang, Gruber, Jan, Gan, Yunn-Hwen (2022-03-22). Glutathione catabolism by Enterobacteriaceae species to hydrogen sulphide adversely affects the viability of host systems in the presence of 5 ' fluorodeoxyuridine. MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY 117 (5) : 1089-1103. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.14893
dc.identifier.issn0950-382X
dc.identifier.issn1365-2958
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/238399
dc.description.abstractReduced glutathione (GSH) plays an essential role in relieving oxidative insult from the generation of free radicals via normal physiological processes. However, GSH can be exploited by bacteria as a signalling molecule for the regulation of virulence. We describe findings arising from a serendipitous observation that when GSH and Escherichia coli were incubated with 5′fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR)-synchronised populations of Caenorhabditis elegans, the nematodes underwent rapid death. Death was mediated by the production of hydrogen sulphide mainly through the action of tnaA, a tryptophanase-encoding gene in E. coli. Other Enterobacteriaceae species possess similar cysteine desulfhydrases that can catabolise l-cysteine-containing compounds to hydrogen sulphide and mediate nematode killing when worms had been pre-treated with FUdR. When colonic epithelial cell lines were infected, hydrogen sulphide produced by these bacteria in the presence of GSH was also able to inhibit ATP synthesis in these cells particularly when cells had been treated with FUdR. Therefore, bacterial production of hydrogen sulphide could act in concert with a commonly used genotoxic cancer drug to exert host cell impairment. Hydrogen sulphide also increases bacterial adhesion to the intestinal cells. These findings could have implications for patients undergoing chemotherapy using FUdR analogues that could result in intestinal damage.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectbacteria
dc.subjectCaenorhabditis elegans
dc.subjectglutathione
dc.subjecthydrogen sulphide
dc.subjectintestine
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2023-03-24T09:07:49Z
dc.contributor.departmentBIOCHEMISTRY
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF SURGERY
dc.contributor.departmentYALE-NUS COLLEGE
dc.description.doi10.1111/mmi.14893
dc.description.sourcetitleMOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY
dc.description.volume117
dc.description.issue5
dc.description.page1089-1103
dc.published.statePublished
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements
Students Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Glutathione catabolism by Enterobacteriaceae species to hydrogen sulphide adversely affects the viability of host systems in.pdfPublished version795.3 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.