Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013654
Title: The Associations between Upper and Lower Body Muscle Strength and Diabetes among Midlife Women
Authors: Wong, Beverly WX 
Thu, Win Pa Pa 
Chan, Yiong Huak 
Kramer, Michael S 
Logan, Susan 
Cauley, Jane A 
Yong, Eu-Leong 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
muscle strength
diabetes
midlife
Singapore
IWHP
GRIP STRENGTH
PHYSICAL FUNCTION
SKELETAL-MUSCLE
OLDER-ADULTS
RISK-FACTORS
STAND TEST
HEALTH
PERFORMANCE
RELIABILITY
MELLITUS
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2022
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Wong, Beverly WX, Thu, Win Pa Pa, Chan, Yiong Huak, Kramer, Michael S, Logan, Susan, Cauley, Jane A, Yong, Eu-Leong (2022-10-01). The Associations between Upper and Lower Body Muscle Strength and Diabetes among Midlife Women. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH 19 (20). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013654
Abstract: We hypothesized that a combined index of upper and lower body muscle strength would be more strongly associated with diabetes than either measure alone. Women recruited into the Integrated Women’s Health Program had their handgrip strength (HGS) measured using a dynamometer and underwent a timed 5-repetition chair stand (RCS) test. HGS < 18 kg and RCS performance ≥ 12 s assessed upper and lower body strength, respectively, both individually and combined in a muscle strength index (MSI). Diabetes was defined as physician-diagnosed, use of anti-diabetic medication, or fasting blood glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L. Binary logistic regression examined the associations between muscle strength and diabetes. Of 1170 midlife women, 12.1% had diabetes. A low HGS was independently associated with diabetes (aOR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.44). Prolonged RCS was also associated with diabetes (aOR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.09, 2.30), but this was not independent of visceral adiposity and muscle mass. A poor MSI had higher odds of diabetes (aOR: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.40, 4.03), independent of age, ethnicity, education level, menopausal status, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, height, visceral adiposity, and muscle mass. The combination of both upper and lower body muscle strength into a composite MSI was more strongly associated with diabetes than either weak HGS or prolonged RCS alone in midlife women.
Source Title: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234718
ISSN: 1661-7827
1660-4601
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph192013654
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