Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3791/55597
Title: Using Extraordinary Optical Transmission to Quantify Cardiac Biomarkers in Human Serum
Authors: Patra, Abhijeet
Ding, Tao 
Hong, Minghui
Richards, Arthur Mark 
Wong, Ten It
Zhou, Xiaodong
Drum, Chester Lee 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Bioengineering
Issue 130
Nanoimprint lithography
biosensor
troponin
localized surface plasmon resonance
SURFACE-PLASMON RESONANCE
SUBWAVELENGTH HOLE ARRAYS
NANOFABRICATION
LITHOGRAPHY
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2017
Publisher: JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS
Citation: Patra, Abhijeet, Ding, Tao, Hong, Minghui, Richards, Arthur Mark, Wong, Ten It, Zhou, Xiaodong, Drum, Chester Lee (2017-12-01). Using Extraordinary Optical Transmission to Quantify Cardiac Biomarkers in Human Serum. JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS 2017 (130). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3791/55597
Abstract: For a biosensing platform to have clinical relevance in point-of-care (POC) settings, assay sensitivity, reproducibility, and ability to reliably monitor analytes against the background of human serum are crucial. Nanoimprinting lithography (NIL) was used to fabricate, at a low cost, sensing areas as large as 1.5 mm x 1.5 mm. The sensing surface was made of high-fidelity arrays of nanoholes, each with an area of about 140 nm2. The great reproducibility of NIL made it possible to employ a onechip, one-measurement strategy on 12 individually manufactured surfaces, with minimal chip-to-chip variation. These nanoimprinted localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) chips were extensively tested on their ability to reliably measure a bioanalyte at concentrations varying from 2.5 to 75 ng/mL amidst the background of a complex biofluid-in this case, human serum. The high fidelity of NIL enables the generation of large sensing areas, which in turn eliminates the need for a microscope, as this biosensor can be easily interfaced with a commonly available laboratory light source. These biosensors can detect cardiac troponin in serum with a high sensitivity, at a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.55 ng/ mL, which is clinically relevant. They also show low chip-to-chip variance (due to the high quality of the fabrication process). The results are commensurable with widely used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assays, but the technique retains the advantages of an LSPR-based sensing platform (i.e., amenability to miniaturization and multiplexing, making it more feasible for POC applications).
Source Title: JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234696
ISSN: 1940-087X,1940-087X
DOI: 10.3791/55597
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