Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2006)132:1(36)
Title: Pile behavior due to excavation-induced soil movement in clay. I: Stable wall
Authors: Ong, DEL
Leung, CE 
Chow, YK 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Technology
Physical Sciences
Engineering, Geological
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Engineering
Geology
CENTRIFUGE MODEL TESTS
DIAPHRAGM WALLS
COLLAPSE
SUBJECT
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2006
Publisher: ASCE-AMER SOC CIVIL ENGINEERS
Citation: Ong, DEL, Leung, CE, Chow, YK (2006-01-01). Pile behavior due to excavation-induced soil movement in clay. I: Stable wall. JOURNAL OF GEOTECHNICAL AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 132 (1) : 36-44. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2006)132:1(36)
Abstract: A series of centrifuge model tests has been conducted to investigate the behavior of a single pile subjected to excavation-induced soil movements behind a stable retaining wall in clay. The results reveal that after the completion of soil excavation, the wall and the soil continue to move and such movement induces further bending moment and deflection on an adjacent pile. For a pile located within 3m behind the wall where the soil experiences large shear strain (>2%) due to stress relief as a result of the excavation, the induced pile bending moment and deflection reach their maximum values sometime after soil excavation and thereafter decrease slightly with time. For a pile located 3m beyond the wall, the induced pile bending moment and deflection continue to increase slightly with time after excavation until the end of the test. A numerical model developed at the National University of Singapore is used to back-analyze the centrifuge test data. The method gives a reasonably good prediction of the induced bending moment and deflection on a pile located at 3m or beyond the wall. For a pile located at 1m behind the wall where the soil experiences large shear strain (>2%) due to stress relief resulting from the excavation, the calculated pile response is in good agreement with the measured data if the correct soil shear strength obtained from postexcavation is used in the analysis. However, if the original soil shear strength prior to excavation is used in the analysis, this leads to an overestimation of the maximum bending moment of about 25%. The practical implications of the findings are also discussed in this paper. © 2006 ASCE.
Source Title: JOURNAL OF GEOTECHNICAL AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/211196
ISSN: 10900241
19435606
DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2006)132:1(36)
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