Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-021-10012-7
Title: Pathological Gambling, Gambling Disorder, and Problem Gambling Among the Chinese Ethnic Population Living in Western Countries: Is Culture a Sufficient Explanation for the Reported Excess Rates?
Authors: Chee Tji Tjian 
LUI YIT SHIANG 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Substance Abuse
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Psychology
Pathological gambling
Gambling disorder
Problem gambling
Chinese ethnic
Culture
Western countries
Issue Date: 1-Feb-2021
Publisher: SPRINGER
Citation: Chee Tji Tjian, LUI YIT SHIANG (2021-02-01). Pathological Gambling, Gambling Disorder, and Problem Gambling Among the Chinese Ethnic Population Living in Western Countries: Is Culture a Sufficient Explanation for the Reported Excess Rates?. JOURNAL OF GAMBLING STUDIES 37 (3) : 927-945. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-021-10012-7
Abstract: A significant gap remains in the understanding of the psychosocial and cultural factors and processes in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling, gambling disorder, and problem gambling among the Chinese ethnic population living in the Western countries. This narrative reviews papers on gambling and pathological gambling among the Chinese ethnic group in Western countries to provide a deeper understanding of the cultural and psychosocial factors and processes that lead to the development and maintenance of pathological gambling, gambling disorder, and problem gambling. The factors leading to development of problem gambling, which also carry distinctive cultural differences, include acculturation process among Chinese migrants to western countries, their social learning patterns in gambling, the patterns and motivation seen in Chinese gamblers, their gambling-related cognitive bias and distortions as well as barriers to their help-seeking behaviours. The collectivistic oriental culture may explain for intrafamilial development of gambling behaviour and this strong male authority in the traditional Chinese family set-up also reinforces this influence. The Chinese culture is associated with increased risk-taking behaviour. Superstitious thinking is more prevalent in the Chinese culture and this can be manifested in individuals’ perceptions of fate and luck. Future research projects studying pathological gambling and ethnic minorities in the UK should seek greater understanding and improved management of this condition in a small but highly relevant population.
Source Title: JOURNAL OF GAMBLING STUDIES
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/208778
ISSN: 1050-5350
1573-3602
DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10012-7
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Chee-Lui2021_Article_PathologicalGamblingGamblingDi 2021-06-28 04_36_20.pdfPublished version663.83 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

Page view(s)

113
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Download(s)

7
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.