Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11070356
Title: The Hungry ghost festival in Singapore: Getai (songs on stage) in the lunar seventh month
Authors: Chan, H.Y.
Keywords: Getai
Hungry Ghost Festival
Singapore
State power
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: MDPI AG
Citation: Chan, H.Y. (2020). The Hungry ghost festival in Singapore: Getai (songs on stage) in the lunar seventh month. Religions 11 (7) : 1-13. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11070356
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: This paper examines the interaction between state power and the everyday life of ordinary Chinese Singaporeans by looking at the Hungry Ghost Festival as a contested category. The paper first develops a theoretical framework building on previous scholars’ examination of the contestation of space and the negotiation of power between state authorities and the public in Singapore. This is followed by a short review of how the Hungry Ghost Festival was celebrated in earlier times in Singapore. The next section of the paper looks at the differences between the celebrations in the past and in contemporary Singapore. The following section focuses on data found in local newspapers on Getai events of the 2017 Lunar Seventh Month. Finally, I identify characteristics of the Ghost Festival in contemporary Singapore by looking at how Getai is performed around Singapore and woven into the fabric of Singaporean daily life. © 2020 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: Religions
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/200572
ISSN: 20771444
DOI: 10.3390/rel11070356
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Students Publications

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