Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/185867
Title: Long-term Influences of Prenatal Maternal Depressive Symptoms on the Amygdala?Prefrontal Circuitry of the Offspring From Birth to Early Childhood
Authors: Lee A. 
Poh J.S. 
Wen D.J. 
Guillaume B. 
Chong Y.-S. 
Shek L.P. 
Fortier M.V. 
Qiu A. 
Keywords: Amygdala?cortical circuitry
Cortical thickness
Prenatal maternal depressive symptoms
Structural covariance
Structural magnetic resonance imaging
Structural network
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Elsevier Inc
Citation: Lee A., Poh J.S., Wen D.J., Guillaume B., Chong Y.-S., Shek L.P., Fortier M.V., Qiu A. (2019). Long-term Influences of Prenatal Maternal Depressive Symptoms on the Amygdala?Prefrontal Circuitry of the Offspring From Birth to Early Childhood. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging 4 (11) : 940 - 947. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Background: Prenatal maternal depression may have long-term impacts on amygdala-cortical development. This study explored associations of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms on the amygdala-cortical structural covariance of the offspring from birth to early childhood, derived from a longitudinal birth cohort. Methods: Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed to obtain the amygdala volume and cortical thickness at each time point. Prenatal maternal depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 26 weeks of pregnancy. Regression analysis was used to examine the effects of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale on a structural coupling between the amygdala volume and cortical thickness at birth (n = 167) and 4.5 years of age (n = 199). Results: Girls whose mothers had high prenatal maternal depressive symptoms showed a positive coupling between the amygdala volume and insula thickness at birth (β = .617, p = .001) but showed a negative coupling between the amygdala volume and inferior frontal thickness at 4.5 years of age (β = −.369, p = .008). No findings were revealed in boys at any time point. Conclusions: The development of the amygdala–prefrontal circuitry is vulnerable to environmental factors related to depression. Such a vulnerability might be sex dependent. © 2019
Source Title: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/185867
ISSN: 24519022
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