Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0235-17.2017
Title: A neural signature encoding decisions under perceptual ambiguity
Authors: Sun, S
Yu, R 
Wang, S
Keywords: adult
ambiguity
Article
behavior
clinical article
crowding (vision)
electroencephalogram
episodic memory
eye tracking
female
human
human experiment
male
nerve cell network
neuroimaging
priority journal
young adult
brain
decision making
photostimulation
physiology
reaction time
Adult
Brain
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Photic Stimulation
Reaction Time
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Society for Neuroscience
Citation: Sun, S, Yu, R, Wang, S (2017). A neural signature encoding decisions under perceptual ambiguity. eNeuro 4 (6) : e0235-17.2017. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0235-17.2017
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: People often make perceptual decisions with ambiguous information, but it remains unclear whether the brain has a common neural substrate that encodes various forms of perceptual ambiguity. Here, we used three types of perceptually ambiguous stimuli as well as task instructions to examine the neural basis for both stimulus-driven and task-driven perceptual ambiguity. We identified a neural signature, the late positive potential (LPP), that encoded a general form of stimulus-driven perceptual ambiguity. In addition to stimulus-driven ambiguity, the LPP was also modulated by ambiguity in task instructions. To further specify the functional role of the LPP and elucidate the relationship between stimulus ambiguity, behavioral response, and the LPP, we employed regression models and found that the LPP was specifically associated with response latency and confidence rating, suggesting that the LPP encoded decisions under perceptual ambiguity. Finally, direct behavioral ratings of stimulus and task ambiguity confirmed our neurophysiological findings, which could not be attributed to differences in eye movements either. Together, our findings argue for a common neural signature that encodes decisions under perceptual ambiguity but is subject to the modulation of task ambiguity. Our results represent an essential first step toward a complete neural understanding of human perceptual decision making. © 2017 Sun et al.
Source Title: eNeuro
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183490
ISSN: 2373-2822
DOI: 10.1523/ENEURO.0235-17.2017
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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