Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.128182
Title: Synchronous multicentric glioblastoma with PNET and O subtypes: Possible pathogenesis
Authors: Wan, K.R
King, N.K.K
Low, S.Y.Y
Sitoh, Y.-Y 
Lee, H.Y
Wong, C.F
Ng, W.H 
Keywords: temozolomide
adult
article
cancer adjuvant therapy
cancer classification
cancer grading
cancer radiotherapy
cancer surgery
case report
computer assisted tomography
craniotomy
differential diagnosis
disease association
disease duration
dizziness
fatigue
frozen section
gait disorder
glioblastoma
glioblastoma oligodendroglial differentiation
glioblastoma primitive neuroectodermal tumor
headache
histopathology
human
male
memory disorder
metastasis
neuroimaging
neurologic examination
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
pathogenesis
postoperative period
priority journal
susceptibility weighted imaging
treatment outcome
Issue Date: 2014
Citation: Wan, K.R, King, N.K.K, Low, S.Y.Y, Sitoh, Y.-Y, Lee, H.Y, Wong, C.F, Ng, W.H (2014). Synchronous multicentric glioblastoma with PNET and O subtypes: Possible pathogenesis. Surgical Neurology International 5 : 31. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.128182
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Background: Glioblastomas (GBM) are highly infiltrative, cellular and mitotically active tumors with large histologic variations within and between tumours. Several subtypes have been described including the GBM with oligodendroglial differentiation (GBM-O) and primitive neuroectodermal tumour components (GBM-PNET). We report the first described case of a patient with synchronous multi-centric GBM-O and GBM-PNET components. Case Description: A patient, who presented with a short history of progressive headache and difficulty with memory recall, was found on MRI imaging to have two intracranial lesions. These showed heterogeneous enhancement and were found in the left frontal and left temporal regions. The patient underwent gross total resection of these two lesions which were found to show GBM-O and GBM-PNET differentiations. Conclusion: Although tumour cell migration in the context of GBM is a well-recognized phenomenon, the traditional hypothesis is not able to satisfactorily explain this case of multicentric GBM whereby the two lesions demonstrate different cell origins. More current understanding of the migratory pathways from the subventricular zone provide an alternate and plausible pathway that fits our patient's unusual diagnosis. © 2014 Wan KR.
Source Title: Surgical Neurology International
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/183183
ISSN: 21527806
DOI: 10.4103/2152-7806.128182
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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