Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12348-012-0079-5
Title: Clinical spectrum of tuberculous optic neuropathy
Authors: Davis, E.J
Rathinam, S.R
Okada, A.A
Tow, S.L 
Petrushkin, H
Graham, E.M
Chee, S.-P 
Guex-Crosier, Y
Jakob, E
Tugal-Tutkun, I
Cunningham Jr
Leavitt, J.A
Mansour, A.M
Winthrop, K.L
Hills, W.L
Smith, J.R
Keywords: corticosteroid
methylprednisolone
prednisone
tuberculostatic agent
add on therapy
adolescent
adult
article
clinical article
endemic disease
female
follow up
human
male
medical specialist
morbidity
optic nerve
optic nerve disease
papillitis
priority journal
retinitis
travel
tuberculous optic neuropathy
uveitis
visual acuity
visual field
Issue Date: 2012
Citation: Davis, E.J, Rathinam, S.R, Okada, A.A, Tow, S.L, Petrushkin, H, Graham, E.M, Chee, S.-P, Guex-Crosier, Y, Jakob, E, Tugal-Tutkun, I, Cunningham Jr, Leavitt, J.A, Mansour, A.M, Winthrop, K.L, Hills, W.L, Smith, J.R (2012). Clinical spectrum of tuberculous optic neuropathy. Journal of Ophthalmic Inflammation and Infection 2 (4) : 183-189. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12348-012-0079-5
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Purpose: Tuberculous optic neuropathy may follow infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or administration of the bacille Calmette-Guerin. However, this condition is not well described in the ophthalmic literature. Methods: Ophthalmologists, identified through professional electronic networks or previous publications, collected standardized clinical data relating to 62 eyes of 49 patients who they had managed with tuberculous optic neuropathy. Results: Tuberculous optic neuropathy was most commonly manifested as papillitis (51.6 %), neuroretinitis (14.5 %), and optic nerve tubercle (11.3 %). Uveitis was an additional ocular morbidity in 88.7 % of eyes. In 36.7 % of patients, extraocular tuberculosis was present. The majority of patients (69.4 %) had resided in and/or traveled to an endemic area. Although initial visual acuity was 20/50 or worse in 62.9 % of 62 eyes, 76.7 % of 60 eyes followed for a median of 12 months achieved visual acuities of 20/40 or better. Visual field defects were reported for 46.8 % of eyes, but these defects recovered in 63.2 % of 19 eyes with follow-up. Conclusion: Visual recovery from tuberculous optic neuropathy is common, if the diagnosis is recognized and appropriate treatment is instituted. A tuberculous etiology should be considered when evaluating optic neuropathy in persons from endemic areas. © 2012 The Author(s).
Source Title: Journal of Ophthalmic Inflammation and Infection
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181839
ISSN: 18695760
DOI: 10.1007/s12348-012-0079-5
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1007_s12348-012-0079-5.pdf163.05 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

35
checked on Aug 6, 2022

Page view(s)

139
checked on Aug 4, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons