Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1303.060309
Title: Effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing staff absenteeism during pandemic influenza
Authors: Lee, V.J 
Chen, M.I 
Keywords: oseltamivir
sialidase inhibitor
absenteeism
antiviral activity
article
controlled study
cost benefit analysis
disease transmission
drug efficacy
drug safety
health care personnel
health care policy
human
infection prevention
influenza
outcome assessment
pandemic
prophylaxis
sensitivity analysis
simulation
treatment duration
treatment planning
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Citation: Lee, V.J, Chen, M.I (2007). Effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing staff absenteeism during pandemic influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases 13 (3) : 449-457. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1303.060309
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: We used a deterministic SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious-removed) meta-population model, together with scenario, sensitivity, and simulation analyses, to determine stockpiling strategies for neuraminidase inhibitors that would minimize absenteeism among healthcare workers. A pandemic with a basic reproductive number (R0) of 2.5 resulted in peak absenteeism of 10%. Treatment decreased peak absenteeism to 8%, while 8 weeks' prophylaxis reduced it to 2%. For pandemics with higher R0, peak absenteeism exceeded 20% occasionally and 6 weeks' prophylaxis reduced peak absenteeism by 75%. Insufficient duration of prophylaxis increased peak absenteeism compared with treatment only. Earlier pandemic detection and initiation of prophylaxis may render shorter prophylaxis durations ineffective. Eight weeks' prophylaxis substantially reduced peak absenteeism under a broad range of assumptions for severe pandemics (peak absenteeism >10%). Small investments in treatment and prophylaxis, if adequate and timely, can reduce absenteeism among essential staff.
Source Title: Emerging Infectious Diseases
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/181045
ISSN: 1080-6040
DOI: 10.3201/eid1303.060309
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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