Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14821
Title: The human amygdala parametrically encodes the intensity of specific facial emotions and their categorical ambiguity
Authors: Wang, S
Yu, R 
Tyszka, J.M
Zhen, S
Kovach, C
Sun, S
Huang, Y
Hurlemann, R
Ross, I.B
Chung, J.M
Mamelak, A.N
Adolphs, R
Rutishauser, U
Keywords: behavioral response
brain
gene expression
lesion
nervous system disorder
neurology
psychology
adult
amygdala
BOLD signal
case report
facial expression
fear
female
happiness
human
male
nerve cell
neuroimaging
neurosurgery
uncertainty
action potential
adolescent
amygdala
case control study
cytology
emotion
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
pathology
physiology
procedures
young adult
Action Potentials
Adolescent
Adult
Amygdala
Case-Control Studies
Emotions
Facial Expression
Fear
Female
Happiness
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neurons
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Wang, S, Yu, R, Tyszka, J.M, Zhen, S, Kovach, C, Sun, S, Huang, Y, Hurlemann, R, Ross, I.B, Chung, J.M, Mamelak, A.N, Adolphs, R, Rutishauser, U (2017). The human amygdala parametrically encodes the intensity of specific facial emotions and their categorical ambiguity. Nature Communications 8 : 14821. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14821
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: The human amygdala is a key structure for processing emotional facial expressions, but it remains unclear what aspects of emotion are processed. We investigated this question with three different approaches: Behavioural analysis of 3 amygdala lesion patients, neuroimaging of 19 healthy adults, and single-neuron recordings in 9 neurosurgical patients. The lesion patients showed a shift in behavioural sensitivity to fear, and amygdala BOLD responses were modulated by both fear and emotion ambiguity (the uncertainty that a facial expression is categorized as fearful or happy). We found two populations of neurons, one whose response correlated with increasing degree of fear, or happiness, and a second whose response primarily decreased as a linear function of emotion ambiguity. Together, our results indicate that the human amygdala processes both the degree of emotion in facial expressions and the categorical ambiguity of the emotion shown and that these two aspects of amygdala processing can be most clearly distinguished at the level of single neurons. © The Author(s) 2017.
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179760
ISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14821
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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