Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/srep45532
Title: Degradation of neural representations in higher visual cortex by sleep deprivation
Authors: Poh, J.-H 
Chee, M.W.L 
Keywords: attention
cell dedifferentiation
clinical study
degradation
human
modulation
sleep deprivation
visual cortex
adult
brain mapping
face
female
image processing
male
nerve cell
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
pathophysiology
pattern recognition
photostimulation
physiology
procedures
reaction time
rest
sleep deprivation
visual cortex
young adult
Adult
Attention
Brain Mapping
Face
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neurons
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Photic Stimulation
Reaction Time
Rest
Sleep Deprivation
Visual Cortex
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Poh, J.-H, Chee, M.W.L (2017). Degradation of neural representations in higher visual cortex by sleep deprivation. Scientific Reports 7 : 45532. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep45532
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: A night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) impairs selective attention and is accompanied by attenuated activation within ventral visual cortex (VVC). However, finer details of how TSD compromises selectivity of visual processing remain unclear. Drawing from prior work in cognitive aging, we predicted that TSD would result in dedifferentiation of neural responses for faces and houses within the VVC. Instead, we found preservation of category selectivity. This was observed both in voxels highly selective for each category, and also across multiple voxels evaluated using MVPA. Based on prior findings of impaired attentional modulation following TSD, we also predicted reduced biasing of neural representations towards the attended category when participants viewed ambiguous face/house images. When participants were well rested, attention to houses (or faces) caused activation patterns to more closely resemble those elicited by isolated house (face) images than face (house) images. During TSD, attention to faces enhanced neural similarity to both target (face) and distractor (house) representations, signifying reduced suppression of irrelevant information. Degraded sensory processing reflected in reduced VVC activation following TSD, thus appears to be a result of impaired top-down modulation of sensory representations instead of degraded selectivity of maximally category sensitive voxels, or the dedifferentiation of neural activation patterns. © The Author(s) 2017.
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/179725
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/srep45532
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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