Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31193-z
Title: Animal infection studies of two recently discovered African bat paramyxoviruses, Achimota 1 and Achimota 2
Authors: Barr, J
Todd, S
Crameri, G
Foord, A
Marsh, G
Frazer, L
Payne, J
Harper, J
Baker, K.S
Cunningham, A.A
Wood, J.L.N
Middleton, D
Wang, L.-F 
Keywords: virus antibody
virus antigen
virus RNA
animal
Bagg albino mouse
bat
blood
bronchus
epithelium cell
female
guinea pig
isolation and purification
male
metabolism
Mustela putorius furo
Paramyxoviridae
paramyxovirus infection
pathology
physiology
serodiagnosis
time factor
veterinary medicine
viremia
virology
virus shedding
Animals
Antibodies, Viral
Antigens, Viral
Bronchi
Chiroptera
Epithelial Cells
Female
Ferrets
Guinea Pigs
Male
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Neutralization Tests
Paramyxoviridae
Paramyxoviridae Infections
RNA, Viral
Time Factors
Viremia
Virus Shedding
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Barr, J, Todd, S, Crameri, G, Foord, A, Marsh, G, Frazer, L, Payne, J, Harper, J, Baker, K.S, Cunningham, A.A, Wood, J.L.N, Middleton, D, Wang, L.-F (2018). Animal infection studies of two recently discovered African bat paramyxoviruses, Achimota 1 and Achimota 2. Scientific Reports 8 (1) : 12744. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31193-z
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Bats are implicated as the natural reservoirs for several highly pathogenic viruses that can infect other animal species, including man. Here, we investigate the potential for two recently discovered bat rubulaviruses, Achimota virus 1 (AchPV1) and Achimota virus 2 (AchPV2), isolated from urine collected under urban bat (Eidolon helvum) roosts in Ghana, West Africa, to infect small laboratory animals. AchPV1 and AchPV2 are classified in the family Paramyxoviridae and cluster with other bat derived zoonotic rubulaviruses (i.e. Sosuga, Menangle and Tioman viruses). To assess the susceptibility of AchPV1 and AchPV2 in animals, infection studies were conducted in ferrets, guinea pigs and mice. Seroconversion, immunohistological evidence of infection, and viral shedding were identified in ferrets and guinea pigs, but not in mice. Infection was associated with respiratory disease in ferrets. Viral genome was detected in a range of tissues from ferrets and guinea pigs, however virus isolation was only achieved from ferret tissues. The results from this study indicate Achimota viruses (AchPVs) are able to cross the species barrier. Consequently, vigilance for infection with and disease caused by these viruses in people and domesticated animals is warranted in sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula where the reservoir hosts are present. © 2018, The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178393
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31193-z
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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