Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1017/S2040174420000549
Title: Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: Impact of environmental dust exposure in modulating microbiome and its association with non-communicable diseases
Authors: Ooi, DSQ 
Tan, CPT 
Tay, MJY 
Ong, SG
Tham, EH 
Siah, KTH
Eriksson, JG 
Godfrey, KM
Shek, LPC 
Loo, EXL 
Keywords: Dust
microbiome
non-communicable diseases
particulate matter
Issue Date: 15-Jun-2020
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
Citation: Ooi, DSQ, Tan, CPT, Tay, MJY, Ong, SG, Tham, EH, Siah, KTH, Eriksson, JG, Godfrey, KM, Shek, LPC, Loo, EXL (2020-06-15). Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: Impact of environmental dust exposure in modulating microbiome and its association with non-communicable diseases. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease : 1-12. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2040174420000549
Abstract: © Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2020. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including obesity, diabetes, and allergy are chronic, multi-factorial conditions that are affected by both genetic and environmental factors. Over the last decade, the microbiome has emerged as a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of NCDs. Microbiome profiles were altered in patients with NCDs, and shift in microbial communities was associated with improvement in these health conditions. Since the genetic component of these diseases cannot be altered, the ability to manipulate the microbiome holds great promise for design of novel therapies in the prevention and treatment of NCDs. Together, the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease concept and the microbial hypothesis propose that early life exposure to environmental stimuli will alter the development and composition of the human microbiome, resulting in health consequences. Recent studies indicated that the environment we are exposed to in early life is instrumental in shaping robust immune development, possibly through modulation of the human microbiome (skin, airway, and gut). Despite much research into human microbiome, the origin of their constituent microbiota remains unclear. Dust (also known as particulate matter) is a key determinant of poor air quality in the modern urban environment. It is ubiquitous and serves as a major source and reservoir of microbial communities that modulates the human microbiome, contributing to health and disease. There are evidence that reported significant associations between environmental dust and NCDs. In this review, we will focus on the impact of dust exposure in shaping the human microbiome and its possible contribution to the development of NCDs.
Source Title: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/177297
ISSN: 20401744
20401752
DOI: 10.1017/S2040174420000549
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