Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7111
Title: Mechanics of epithelial closure over non-adherent environments
Authors: Vedula, S.R.K 
Peyret, G
Cheddadi, I
Chen, T 
Brugués, A
Hirata, H 
Lopez-Menendez, H
Toyama, Y 
Neves De Almeida, L
Trepat, X
Lim, C.T 
Ladoux, B 
Keywords: myosin adenosine triphosphatase
actin
myosin adenosine triphosphatase
Article
cell proliferation
controlled study
epithelium cell
force
human
human cell
keratinocyte
mechanics
microscopy
molecular model
simulation
tension
tissue level
traction force microscopy
actin filament
animal
atomic force microscopy
cell adhesion
chemistry
computer simulation
confocal microscopy
dog
epithelium
extracellular matrix
MDCK cell line
metabolism
theoretical model
tumor cell line
Actin Cytoskeleton
Actins
Actomyosin
Animals
Cell Adhesion
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Proliferation
Computer Simulation
Dogs
Epithelium
Extracellular Matrix
Humans
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Microscopy, Atomic Force
Microscopy, Confocal
Models, Theoretical
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Vedula, S.R.K, Peyret, G, Cheddadi, I, Chen, T, Brugués, A, Hirata, H, Lopez-Menendez, H, Toyama, Y, Neves De Almeida, L, Trepat, X, Lim, C.T, Ladoux, B (2015). Mechanics of epithelial closure over non-adherent environments. Nature Communications 6 : 6111. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7111
Abstract: The closure of gaps within epithelia is crucial to maintain its integrity during biological processes such as wound healing and gastrulation. Depending on the distribution of extracellular matrix, gap closure occurs through assembly of multicellular actin-based contractile cables or protrusive activity of border cells into the gap. Here we show that the supracellular actomyosin contractility of cells near the gap edge exerts sufficient tension on the surrounding tissue to promote closure of non-adherent gaps. Using traction force microscopy, we observe that cell-generated forces on the substrate at the gap edge first point away from the centre of the gap and then increase in the radial direction pointing into the gap as closure proceeds. Combining with numerical simulations, we show that the increase in force relies less on localized purse-string contractility and more on large-scale remodelling of the suspended tissue around the gap. Our results provide a framework for understanding the assembly and the mechanics of cellular contractility at the tissue level. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175517
ISSN: 20411723
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7111
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