Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8683
Title: Gap geometry dictates epithelial closure efficiency
Authors: Ravasio, A 
Cheddadi, I
Chen, T 
Pereira, T
Ong, H.T 
Bertocchi, C 
Brugues, A
Jacinto, A
Kabla, A.J
Toyama, Y 
Trepat, X
Gov, N
Neves De Almeida, L
Ladoux, B 
Keywords: fibronectin
myosin adenosine triphosphatase
myosin adenosine triphosphatase
biological development
cells and cell components
computer simulation
physiology
tumor
wounding
actin filament
actin polymerization
animal cell
Article
cell adhesion
cell interaction
cell junction
cell motility
cell motion
controlled study
cross linking
Drosophila melanogaster
EC50
epithelium
epithelium cell
focal adhesion
immunofluorescence
in vitro study
in vivo study
lamellipodium
laser surgery
nonhuman
randomized controlled trial
wound closure
animal
computer simulation
dog
epithelium
fluorescent antibody technique
intravital microscopy
low level laser therapy
MDCK cell line
metabolism
microsurgery
physiology
wound healing
Actomyosin
Animals
Cell Movement
Computer Simulation
Dogs
Drosophila melanogaster
Epithelial Cells
Epithelium
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
In Vitro Techniques
Intravital Microscopy
Laser Therapy
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Microsurgery
Wound Healing
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Ravasio, A, Cheddadi, I, Chen, T, Pereira, T, Ong, H.T, Bertocchi, C, Brugues, A, Jacinto, A, Kabla, A.J, Toyama, Y, Trepat, X, Gov, N, Neves De Almeida, L, Ladoux, B (2015). Gap geometry dictates epithelial closure efficiency. Nature Communications 6 : 8683. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms8683
Abstract: Closure of wounds and gaps in tissues is fundamental for the correct development and physiology of multicellular organisms and, when misregulated, may lead to inflammation and tumorigenesis. To re-establish tissue integrity, epithelial cells exhibit coordinated motion into the void by active crawling on the substrate and by constricting a supracellular actomyosin cable. Coexistence of these two mechanisms strongly depends on the environment. However, the nature of their coupling remains elusive because of the complexity of the overall process. Here we demonstrate that epithelial gap geometry in both in vitro and in vivo regulates these collective mechanisms. In addition, the mechanical coupling between actomyosin cable contraction and cell crawling acts as a large-scale regulator to control the dynamics of gap closure. Finally, our computational modelling clarifies the respective roles of the two mechanisms during this process, providing a robust and universal mechanism to explain how epithelial tissues restore their integrity. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175499
ISSN: 20411723
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms8683
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